Frankenstein Essay.docx - White 1 Spencer White Professor Lutz English 2030 Frankenstein The Man and Monster When two beings share the same name a story

Frankenstein Essay.docx - White 1 Spencer White Professor...

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White 1 Spencer White Professor Lutz English 2030 10/31/17 Frankenstein: The Man and Monster When two beings share the same name, a story of unmatched proportions arises. In Frankenstein there is an undeniable relationship of Creator and Creation between Frankenstein and the monster. While this relationship is undeniably great, it leads to events that ended in only death. However, I believe that it isn’t simply Frankenstein’s fault for the novel’s events, but the fault of the Monster as well. The conflicts of the creation, humanity, and revenge all tie together to show the fault on both sides. First, the results of the Monster’s creation. Throughout the novel the relationship between Frankenstein and the Monster is often referenced to that of God and Adam. When speaking to Frankenstein the Monster even says, “I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam” (103). This statement shows the Monster is intelligent and recognizes who his creator was. Throughout Frankenstein the Monster shows exemplary levels of comprehension and intelligence, leading readers, or Walton, to believe that the Monster bears some resemblance to Frankenstein. This is especially evident when you realize that the monster has only been alive for 2 years at the time of the climactic conversation. Despite Frankenstein realizing the level of the Monster’s intelligence, he rejects the monster even further. I think the reason that he continues to reject the Monster is because Frankenstein is still afraid of the monster. The monster’s intelligence adds to Frankenstein’s fears instead of relieving them.
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White 2 Frankenstein pulled off the miracle of creating life from death. He was the Monster’s creator and as such Frankenstein had certain responsibilities that he neglected immediately. As the Monster’s creator, Frankenstein had a responsibility to care for the monster. If the Monster had received care instead of rejection, many of the novel’s conflicts wouldn’t have existed.
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