Equanimity.pdf - Christina Feldman Rick Hanson Richard Mendius In the Dharma and in Your Brain Equanimity 1 Depths of Equanimity Wise View and

Equanimity.pdf - Christina Feldman Rick Hanson Richard...

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1 Equanimity: In the Dharma and in Your Brain Christina Feldman Rick Hanson Richard Mendius
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2 Plan for the Day Context Equanimity in Buddhist Thought and Practice Meditative Foundations The Brain: Sometimes Peaceful, Sometimes Not Mindfulness of Feeling Lunch When the Brain Gets Upset . . . . . . And What You Can Do about It Meditation on the Parasympathetic Nervous System Wise View and Equanimity Depths of Equanimity
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3 Indeed, the sage who's fully quenched Rests at ease in every way; No sense desire adheres to him or her Whose fires have cooled, deprived of fuel. All attachments have been severed, The heart's been led away from pain; Tranquil, he or she rests with utmost ease. The mind has found its way to peace. The Buddha
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4 Common - and Fertile - Ground Neuroscience Psychology Buddhism
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5 When the uninstructed worldling experiences a painful feeling, she sorrows, grieves, and laments; she weeps beating her breast and becomes distraught. She feels two feelings - a bodily one and a mental one. Suppose they were to strike a man with a dart, and then strike him immediately afterward with a second dart, so that the man would feel a feeling caused by two darts. So too, when the uninstructed worldling experiences a painful feeling, she feels two feelings - a bodily one and a mental one.° The Buddha, SN36:6
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6 Basics of Meditation Relax Posture that is comfortable and alert Simple good will toward yourself Awareness of your body Focus on something to steady your attention Accepting whatever passes through awareness, not resisting it or chasing it Gently settling into peaceful well-being
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7 Know the mind. Shape the mind. Free the mind.
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8 Foundations of Meditation Setting an intention - “top-down” frontal lobes, “bottom-up” limbic system Relaxing the body - parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) Feeling safer - inhibits amygdala/ hippocampus vigilance circuits Evoking positive emotion - dopamine, norepinephrine Absorbing the benefits - primes memory circuits throughout the brain
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9 “Ardent, Diligent, Resolute, and Mindful”
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10 The Union of Mind and Body Subjective experience correlates with brain activities. Change your experience - and you change your brain , temporarily and then permanently. Change your brain - and you change your experience .
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11 Meditation - Long-term Physical Effects Dampens reactivity to stress Dampens amygdala responses Sensitizes and strengthens parasympathetic system Thickens brain regions (= makes them stronger): Anterior cingulate (controlling attention, integrating thinking/feeling) Insula (interoceptive awareness, empathy) Less cortical thinning with aging Increases left frontal activation: more positive emotions Primes brain to enter states of very fast pulses of coherent neural activity integrating broad regions Increases serotonin (supporting mood, sleep, digestion)
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12 One Simple Neuron . . .
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