BIO 309D S08 Lec6 - Homeostasis Homeostasis is a state of...

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Homeostasis Homeostasis is a state of relative internal constancy Must constantly adjust in response to changes in the internal and external environments
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Homeostasis is maintained by Negative Feedback Corrective measures that slow or reverse a variation from the normal value of a factor
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Homeostatic control mechanism (negative feedback mechanisms) Receptor (sensor) Detects change and sends the information to the control center Control center Compares information from receptors to set point (normal value) Usually part of your brain Sends signal to effector Effector Carries out selected response Muscle or gland
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Neurons Functional Units of the Nervous System
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The Nervous System
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Cells of the Nervous System Neuroglial cells Neurons
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Neuroglial Cells
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Neurons Functional units of the nervous system Three general types of neurons Neuron structure
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Sensory Neurons Afferent neurons
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Interneurons Association neurons
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Motor Neurons Efferent neurons
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Neuron Structure Cell body Dendrites Axon
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Myelin Sheath
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Nerves Three types of nerves
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Neuron Signaling Neurons propagate electrical signals Nerve impulses Action potentials Changes in membrane potential
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Membrane Potential The charge difference across a membrane (bwn cytoplasm and extracellular fluid
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BIO 309D S08 Lec6 - Homeostasis Homeostasis is a state of...

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