ANT 345C summary - Although not in the same circumstances the working-class neighborhoods of Manchester can parallel the development of Wacker

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ANT 345C Sep. 20 Writing Assignment: Week 4 This weeks readings discussed the planning and development of the elegant Wacker Drive in Chicago and the horribly developed working-class neighborhoods of Manchester. While one article focuses on the development of elegance and complexity in one city and the other focuses on a dilapidated and poorly planned neighborhood, both speak of the demolition of sections of the cities to create public roads/spaces. Wacker Drive was developed in 1925 out of the necessity to alleviate severe congestion in Chicago’s streets and sidewalks. As the city boomed and more people moved into the city to be closer to work, traffic in the city’s main center became unbearable. Although lots of bureaucracy went into the planning and eventual development of Wacker Drive, when it was completed it not only eased pedestrian traffic but also raised property values. But before Wacker Drive could be developed an entire strip of the city was completely demolished and cleared away.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Although not in the same circumstances, the working-class neighborhoods of Manchester can parallel the development of Wacker Drive in Chicago. As stated in the article, Old Town was a poorly planned district with narrow, winding streets and was severely overpopulated and overdeveloped. This resulted in filthy, insufferable living conditions for the working class of the city. In the newer portion of the district, the circumstances are only marginally better, if at all. The difference in this part of the district is that a strip of the run-down houses was destroyed in order to create a wide and acceptable street that is uncharacteristic of the urban neighborhood. While the articles deal with contrasting cities, the underlying theme of both is that the development of urban cities creates excessive crowding which demands the need for the destruction of sections of the city to develop open public space....
View Full Document

This essay was uploaded on 03/25/2008 for the course ANT 345C taught by Professor Johnhartigan during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 2

ANT 345C summary - Although not in the same circumstances the working-class neighborhoods of Manchester can parallel the development of Wacker

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online