EAPS 100 WA2 Hawaiian Volcanoes - Hawaiian Volcanoes I would probably think twice before going to Hawaii on vacation as I am afraid of being stuck

EAPS 100 WA2 Hawaiian Volcanoes - Hawaiian Volcanoes I...

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Hawaiian Volcanoes I would probably think twice before going to Hawaii on vacation, as I am afraid of being stuck there when a volcano erupts. This heaven on earth wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the destructive volcanoes. The Hawaiian Islands are the tops of gigantic volcanic mountains formed by countless eruptions of fluid lava over several million years. The volcanic peaks are the visible part of the Hawaiian (submarine) ridge- Emperor Seamount Chain. For example, the Mauna Kea Volcano island has an altitude of 13,700 feet; but the base of this volcano is 18,000 feet below sea level. While most earthquakes and volcanoes occur along plate boundaries, the Hawaiian volcanoes are in the middle of the Pacific plate. Which brings up the intriguing question: what is responsible for Hawaiian Volcanism? Each Hawaiian island is made up of at least one primary volcano. The Big Island, for instance, is made of 5 major volcanoes: Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Hualalai and Kohala. While Mauna Loa is the largest active volcano on Earth, Kilauea is presently one of the most productive volcanoes on Earth (in terms of how much lava it erupts each year). The Hawaiian islands creates a trail of islands, with a distinct bet shape. The Canadian geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson had put forth a “Hot Spot” hypothesis which is widely accepted due to the theory’s alignment with plate tectonics and scientific data about volcanic island chains. According to him the shape is due to progressive movement of the plate over a deep and fixed hotspot. For a significant period, it was assumed that hotspots are stationary. When the tectonic plate moves across it, the chain

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