Euro DBQ - Ellie Guyon Ap Euro DBQ New Imperialism Causes Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the ambitions of European nations were

Euro DBQ - Ellie Guyon Ap Euro DBQ New Imperialism...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Ellie Guyon Ap Euro 3/11/17 DBQ- New Imperialism: Causes Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the ambitions of European nations were stirred by the industrial revolution and technological advancements, and through this, larger nations were able to exert their power over smaller ones, and the age of imperialism began. This imperialism was motivated by economic benefits of resources, trade and industry in less-developed countries. However, it was also politically motivated by national pride, and socially pushed by feelings of superiority and social hierarchy. European countries like Britain, Germany, Belgium, and France were at the forefront of the imperialistic wave. Britain gained 16 colonies in Africa, established railroads from their Cape colony to Cairo, and gained control of the Suez canal. France controlled 13 countries in Africa and became the second largest colonial empire in the world behind the British Empire. Germany and Belgium also gained colonies in Africa. Belgium most famously controlled the Congo, under the power of King Leopold II. These European countries gained massive wealth from resources they acquired, and global power. The effects of imperialism on the exploited countries was catastrophic, thousands of Africans were enslaved and killed, natural resources were consumed, and relations between countries became hostile. These results occurred due to the economic, political, and social benefits that imperialism offered for European countries. The imperialism that occurred in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries stemmed from the wealth that African countries provided, the
political goal of power that came from national pride, and the belief within imperializing countries of their social superiority. Arguably the most powerful driving force behind imperialism was economic benefits. Not only did colonies offer valuable resources like precious metals, food, and rubber, but it also offered workers and trade routes. The demands of the industrial age were a huge cause of imperialism. Businesses and industries invested heavily in colonies. Document one is an excerpt from Imperialism and World Politics , by Parker T. Moon, a modern historian, which he wrote for the purpose of pointing out what groups and demographics were the strongest participants in imperialism. “The makers of cotton and iron goods have been very much interested in

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture