Equilibrium 2.docx - Equilibrium Part 2*Rebecca Raynor...

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Equilibrium Part 2 *Rebecca Raynor Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Queens College Flushing NY, 11367 Chemistry 114.1 Section 1, Rm 153 Summer 2018 7-19-2018 Professor Edward Look ABSTRACT Products are formed when reactants are mixed. However, the products can also react with each other to form reactants. These reactions can occur at the same time. The rate of product formation equals the rate of reactant formation eventually, which means we have reached equilibrium. Based off of the data I obtained regarding the concentrations of my solutions from the LabQuest spectrometer, I was able to determine an average equilibrium constant, K c = . 000284. INTRODUCTION At equilibrium, the rates of the forward and reverse reactions within a system are equal. A system is no longer in equilibrium if stressed is placed on it which causes the two rates to no longer be equal. The system will eventually return to equilibrium because of the inequality of rates, but it will also change states. For example, perhaps some change causes the forward reaction’s rate to become faster than that of the reverse reaction. This would mean that reactants are being utilized at a faster rate than they are being made and products are being created faster than they are being utilized. As a result, there is a decrease in the amount of reactants but an increase in the amount of products. Because there is a decrease in amount of reactants, the forward reaction rate will begin to slow down, while the increase in amount of product causes the rate of the reverse reaction to increase. This will continue until the rates of the two reactions are once again equal and the system is at equilibrium again. In order to reach equilibrium in this scenario, a net conversion of reactants to products

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