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Unformatted text preview: DOCUMENT RESUME CS 215 435 ED 397 453 AUTHOR TITLE INSTITUTION REPORT NO PUB DATE NOTE AVAILABLE FROM PUB 'TYPE EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS IDENTIFIERS Neumann, Bonnie H., Ed.; McDonnell, Helen M., Ed. Teaching the Short Story: A Guide to Using Stories from around the World. National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, ISBN-0-8141-1947-6 96 311p. National Council of Teachers of English, 1111 W. Kenyon Road, Urbana, IL 61801-1096 (Stock No. 19476: $15.95 members, $21.95 nonmembers). Teaching Guides (For Classroom Use Guides General (020) Collected Works Teacher) (052) Books (010) MF01/PC13 Plus Postage. Authors; Higher Education; High Schools; *Literary Criticism; Literary Devices; *Literature Appreciation; Multicultural Education; *Short Stories; *World Literature *Comparative Literature; *Literature in Translation; Response to Literature ABSTRACT An innovative and practical resource for teachers looking to move beyond English and American works, this book explores 175 highly teachable short stories from nearly 50 countries, highlighting the work of recognized authors from practically every continent, authors such as Chinua Achebe, Anita Desai, Nadine Gordimer, Milan Kundera, Isak Dinesen, Octavio Paz, Jorge Amado, and Yukio Mishima. The stories in the book were selected and annotated by experienced teachers, and include information about the author, a synopsis of the story, and comparisons to frequently anthologized stories and readily available literary and artistic works. Also provided are six practical indexes, including those'that help teachers select short stories by title, country of origin, English-languag- source, comparison by themes, or comparison by literary devices. The final index, the cross-reference index, summarizes all the comparative material cited within the book, with the titles of annotated books appearing in capital letters. (NKA) *********************************************************************** Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original document. *********************************************************************** ES ;I-1 -Wrs PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE AND DISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS BEER GRANTED BY , , BEST COPY HAMAD rI nr TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)2 0 U S DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ma or Educational Research and Improvement EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC) Gef riis document has been reproduced as received from the person or organization originating it 0 Minor changes have been maoe to improve reproduction quality Points cif view or opinions stated in this document do not necessarily represent official OERI position or policy .. TEACHING THE SHORT STORY \ In 7 NCTE Editorial Board: Pat Cordeiro, Colette Daiute, Hazel Davis, Bobbi Fisher, Brenda Greene, Richard Luckert, Aileen Pace Nilsen, Jerrie Cobb Scott, Karen Smith, Chair, ex officio, Dawn Boyer, ex officio NCIE Committee on World and Comparative Literature Bonnie H. Neumann, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania Helen M. McDonnell, Ocean Township High School, Oakhurst, New Jersey (retired) James DeMuth, University of Wisconsin-River Falls (deceased) Mary Alice Fite, Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, Ohio Daphne Gmbovoi, Silverado.High School, Las Vegas, Nevada Judith A. Granese, Valley High School, Las Vegas, Nevada Hobart Jarrett, Professor Emeritus, Brooklyn College, City College of New York Myrtle J. Jones, Professor Emerita, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia Paul G. Lankford, Green Run High School, Virginia Beach, Virginia May Lee, Baldwin Senior High School, Baldwin, New York Peter T. Markman, Fullerton College, Fullerton, California Roberta Hoffman Markman, California State University, L:mg Beach Elizabeth Max, Professor Emerita, Oklahoma State iniversity, Stillwater Breon Mitchell, Indiana University, Bloomington Renée H. Shea, University of the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C. Ron Smith, Professor Emeritus, Utah State University, Logan Marilyn J. Strelau, Simsbury High School, Simsbury, Connecticut Donald Van Dyke, Glenbrook North High School, Northbrook, Illinois Clifton Warren, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond 4 t5z. o. Bonnie H. Neumann Editor Helen M. McDonnell Associate Editor National Council of Teachers of English 1111 W Kenyon Road, Urbana, Illinois 61801-1096 , Manuscript Editor: Michael Himick Production Editors: Michelle Sanden Joh las, Kurt Austin Cover and Interior Design: Doug Burnett NCTE Stock Number: 19476-3050 © 1996 by the National Council of Teachers of English. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. It is the policy of NCTE in its journals and other publications to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Teaching the short story: a guide to using stories from around the world / Bonnie H. Neumann, editor; Helen M. McDonnell, associate editor. p. cm. Includes indexes. ISBN 8141-1947-6 1. Short story. 2. Short storiesStudy and teaching. 3. Short stories. I. Neumann, Bonnie H., 1942- . H. McDonnell, Helen M. PN3373.T43 1996 808.83'1dc20 96-12993 CIP 6 CONTENTS Introduction xiii Akutagawa Ryfmosuke (Japan) IN A GROVE ANNOTATIONS 1 Alexiou, Elli (Greece) THEY WERE ALL TO BE PITIED Abrahams, Peter (South Africa) EPISODE IN MALAY CAMP 3 GIRLS AT WAR 4 VENGEFUL CREDITOR 5 THE VOTER 6 HOW PORCR-JNCULA THE MULATTO GOT THE CORPSE OFF HIS BACK A WHOLE LOAF 8 THE SCYTHE 18 A SUMMER IN THE SOUTH 19 10 Asturias, Miguel (Guatemala) Aichinger, Ilse (Germany) TATUANA'S TALE 20 11 Aymé, Marcel (France) Aidoo, Ama Ata (''Thana) NO SWEETNESS HERE 17 Andric, Ivo (Bosnia-Herzegovina) Ahmad, Razia Fasih (Pakistan) THE BOUND MAN 16 . Andreyev, Leonid (Russia) LAZARUS 7 15 Amado, Jorge (Brazil) Agnon, S. Y. (Israel) THE DOCUMENT 14 Allende, Isabel (Chile) TWO WORDS Achebe, Chinua (Nigeria) PAPER IS MONEY 13 THE MAN WHO WALKED ThROUGH 12 WALLS 21 TEACHING THE SHORT STORY Ayyoub, Dhu'l Nun (Iraq) FROM BEHIND THE VEIL Colette (France) 22 Balzac, Honoré de (France) THE ATHEIST'S MASS 23 LA GRANDE BRETECHE 24 25 26 28 CHILDREN OF THE SEA 44 45 46 Daudet, Alphonse (France) 30 THE LAST LESSON 48 Desai, Anita (India) 31 32 A DEVOTED SON 49 GAMES AT TWILIGHT 49 Dhlomo, H. I. E. (South Africa) ME DAUGHTER 33 Chekhov, Anton (Russia) 50 Dib, Mohammed (Algeria) THE BET 34 THE DARLING 36 THE KISS 3' NAEMAWHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN 51 Dinesen, Isak (Denmark) Cicellis, Kay (Greece) BRIEF DIALOGUE 43 Danticat, Edwidge (Haiti) Camus, Albert (France) THE GUEST NIGHT FACE UP IN GOD'S PLAINS Calvino, Italo (Italy) ALL AT ONE POINT 42 Curnali, Necati (Turkey) 27 Buzzati, Dino (Italy) THE SLAYING OF THE DRAGON END OF THE GAME ME AFRICAN GRANNIE Borowski, Tadeusz (Poland) THE MAN WITH ME PACKAGE 41 Cubena (Panama) Borges, Jorge Luis (Argentina) THE GARDEN OF FORKING PATHS 40 Cortazar,Julio (Argentina) Boll, Heinrich (Germany) MURKE'S COLLECTED SILENCES THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S MISSUS THREE WOMEN IN MANHATTAN Bjornson, Bjornstjerne (Norway) THE FATHER 39 Condé, Maryse (Guadeloupe) Baykurt, Fakir (Turkey) FRECKLES l'HE LITTLE BOUILLOUX GIRL 38 THE SAILOR BOY'S TALE 52 SORROW-ACRE 53 Diop, Birago (Senegal) THE WAGES OF GOOD vi 8 54 CONTENTS Hahn Moo-sook (Korea) Djilas, Miovan (Montenegro) THE OLD MAN AND THE SONG 55 WAR 56 Hamsun, Knut (Norway) ME CALL OF LIFE Dostoevski, Fyodor (Russia) 56 THE HONEST THIEF 58 WHITE NIGHTS 59 LIGHTS ON ME SEA Head, Bessie (South Africa) 60 HEAVEN IS NOT CLOSED ME POET ME AUTOPSY A WORLD ENDS THE NEW APARTMENT 79 Idris, Youssef (Egypt) 66 THE CHEAPEST NIGHT'S ENTERTAINMENT Gide, Andre (France) 80 Izgii, Muzaffer (Turkey) 67 WANTED: A TOWN WIMOUT A 82 CRAZY Gordimer, Nadine (South Africa) LITTLE WILLIE 68 A SOLDIER'S EMBRACE 69 Kafka, Franz (Czech Republic) Grace, Patricia (New Zealand Maori) A WAY OF TALKING 78 Huber, Heinz (Germany) 65 Fuentes, Carlos (Mexico) THE RETURN OF THE PRODIGAL SON 77 Hildesheimer, Wolfgang (Germany) 64 France, Anatole (France) ME TWO ELENAS 75 Heym, Georg (Germany) 63 Flaubert, Gustave (France) THE PROCURATOR OF JUDEA .75 Hesse, Hermann (Germany) 62 Feng Jicai (China) A SIMPLE HEART 74 BONES Ekwensi, Cyprian (Nigeria) THE MAO BUTTON 73 Hayashi Fumiko (Japan) Dove-Danquah, Mabel (Ghana) THE GREAT BEYOND 72 Haris, Petros (Greece) THE DREAM OF A RIDICULOUS MAN ME TORN VEIL 71 SHADOW 70 vii A HUNGER ARTIST 83 IN THE PENAL COLONY 84 ME JUDGMENT 85 THE METAMORPHOSIS 86 9 TEACHING THE StIORT STORY Kapadia, Kundanika (India) PAPER BOAT Lim, Catherine (Singapore) 87 Kariara, Jonathan (Kenya) HER WARRIOR 87 THE JAY 89 THE MOON ON THE WATER 89 Kundera, Milan (Czech Republic) .91 Lagerkvist, Par (Sweden) 92 Lagerlöf, Selina (Sweden) 93 La Guma, Alex (South Africa) BLANKETS 94 95 97 98 THE PASHA'S DAUGHTER '104 Mann, Thomas (Germany) DISORDER AND EARLY SORROW 165 TONIO KROGER 106 TRISTAN 108 Maupassant, Guy de (France) 98 99 109 Megged, Aharon (Israel) 110 Meleagrou, Hebe (Greece) 111 Merimee, Prosper (France) 112 Mishima Yukio (Japan) PATRIOTISM Lim Beng Hap (Malaysia) POONEK 102 THE VENUS OF ILLE Lenz, Siegfried (Germany) THE IAUGHINGSTOCK 102 ME DISH MONUMENT Laxness, Haldor (Iceland) LILY p!ARY OF A MADMAN THE NAME Lao She (China) GRANDMOTHER TAKES CHARGE Lu Xun (fliina) ME NECKLACE Iandoifi, Tommaso (Italy) PASTORAL 101 THE CONJURER MADE OFF WITH THE HEIR ME OUTLAWS 11./.E OLD MAN OF USUM.9URA AND FilS MISERY Mahfouz, Naguib (Egypt) Kiwon So (Korea) FATHER AND I 100 Lo Liyong,Tahm (Uganda) Kawabata Yasunari (Japan) NOBODY WILL LAUGH PAPER 113 Moravia, Alberto (Italy) THE CHASE 114 THE FALL 115 CONTENTS Papadiamantis, Alexandros (Greece) Mphahlele,Es'kia (South Africa) THE MASTER OF DOORNVLEI ME BEWITCHING OF ME AGA 116 Pavese, Cesare (Italy) Mrozek, Slawomir (Poland) CHILDREN 117 ON A JOURNEY 118 SUICIDES 132 Paz, Octavio (Mexico) MY LIFE WIM THE WAVE Murakaini Haruki (Japan) ON MEETING MY 100 PERCENT WOMAN ONE FINE APRIL MORNING 130 133 Phfen V6 (Vietnam) THE KEY 119 134 Pirandello, Luigi (Italy) Naipaul, V. S. (urinidad) B. WORDSWORTH 119 CINCI 135 THE ENEMY 120 WAR 136 Pontoppidan, Henrik (Denmark) Nakos, Lilika (Greece) THE BROKEN DOLL 121 HELENITSA 122 A FISHER NEST P'u Sung-Ling (China) THE FIGHTING CRICKET Narayan, R. K. (India) FATHER'S HELP 123 A HORSE AND TWO GOATS 123 THE MIRROR 124 ASHAMANJA BABU'S DOG THE MARTYR AN INCIDENT IN THE GHOBASHI HOUSEHOLD 140 141 Rushdi, Rashad (Egypt) 127 ANGUISH 142 Sand, George (Fiance) 128 THE MARQUISE 0 Yong-su (Korea) SEASIDE VILLAGE 139 ME CANDIDATE Nicol, Abioseth (Sierra Leone) AS THE NIGHT THE DAY ANOTHER EVENING AT ME CLUB Roufos, Rodis (Greece) 126 Nhat-Tien (Vietnam) AN UNSOUND SLEEP 139 Rifaat, Alifa (Egypt) 125 Ngugi,James (Kenya) 138 Ray, Satyajit (India) Neu), Martin Andersen (Denmark) BIRDS OF PASSAGE 137 144 Santos, Bienvenido N. (Philippines) 129 ME DAY ME DANCERS CAME ix - Ii 145 TEACHING THE SHORT STORY Sarang, Vilas (India) THE TERRORIST Tamasi, Aron (Hungary) 146 FLASHES IN THE NIGHT Saranti, Galatea (Greece) SUNLIGHT Tanizaki Junichiro (Japan) 147 Sartrejean-Paul (France) THE WALL THE MT OF A MAN 151 152 165 ThE DEATH OF IVAN ILYICH 166 HOW MUCH LAND DOES A MAN NEED 168 Turgenev, Ivan (Russia) Sienkiewicz, Henryk (Poland) YERMOLAY AND THE MILLER'S WIFE l'HE LIGHTHOUSE-KEEPER 153 YANKO THE MUSICIAN 154 169 Valenzuela, Luisa (Argentina) I'M YOUR HORSE IN THE NIGHT Siwertz, Sigfrid (Sweden) 170 Vega, Ana Lydia (Puerto Rico) 154 CLOUD COVER CARIBBEAN Solznenitsyn, Alexan er (Russia) MATRYONA'S HOME 155 'ME RIGHT HAND 156 ZAKHAR-THE-POUCH 157 171 Venezis, Elias (Greece) MYCENAE 172 Verga, Giovanni (Italy) PROPERTY Surangkhanang, K. (Thailand) 173 Villiers de L'Isle-Adam (France) 158 Svevo, Ita lo (Italy) THE DESIRE TO BE A MAN 174 THE TORTURE BY HOPE 175 159 Weller, Archie (Australian Aborigine) Tagore, Rabindranath (India) KABULIWALLAH 164 Tolstoy, Leo (Russia) Siddiqi, Shaukat (Pakistan) IN MY INDOLENCE 163 VILLAGE LIFE 150 THE GRANDMOTHER THE THIEF Theotokis, Konstantinos (Greece) 149 THE COLT IN SPITE OF EVERYTHING 162 THE CARVING Sholokhov, Mikhail (Russia) A MAN OF HONOR TATTOO Taylor, Apirana (New Zealand Maori) 148 Schulz, Bruno (Poland) COCKROACHES 161 GOING HOMF 160 x 12 176 CONTENTS Yahez, Mina (Cuba) WE BLACKS ALL DRINK COFFEE Title 185 Country 191 English-Language Source 195 Suggested Comparison5Themes 201 Suggested ComparisonsLiterary Devices 215 Cross-Reference 221 Editors 299 Contributors 300 178 Yizhar, S. (Israel) HABAKUK 183 177 Yehoshua, Abraham B. (Israel) FACING THE FOREST INDEXES 180 Zola, Emile (France) THE INUNDATION 181 NAN MICOULIN 182 xi ,a INTRODUCTION Teaching the Short Story: A Guide to Using Stories fmm Around the World is a unique resource for teaching the short story at all levels of education. Its format is designed to help teachers select appropriate short works of fiction for study and to identify universal experiences as they are variously expressed in that genre throughout the world. The text emphasizes the importance of recognizing national similarities, of distinguishing unique differences, and of realizing that through the study of great literature one can come to understand and respect systems and ideologies different from one's own. The art of the short story, like all art, reflects the values, basic assumptions, problems, ideals, and philosophical, social, and political climates of the world that created it. Certainly, if we are to have world peace in its most comprehensive sense, it has to come with the tolerance, appreciation, and respect founded on an exposure to, and an understanding of, the experiences of others.Ultimately, we can see in the lowest common denominav the universality of humanity's most basic concerns and of the human condition for which each story serves as a basic metaphor. At no time in the history of art has such an enterprise had more crucial consequences. The short stories annotated in this text have been carefully selected to represent the best stories from as many countries as possible, excluding the English-speaking countries, since their stories are frequently anthologized and fully discussed in readily available textbooks. Most of the stories included were thus originally written in languages other than English. Generally, we have listed the translator of the English-language version used in our discussions. If no translator is listed, either none was identified in our English-language source or the story was originally written in English. Although we have selected the finest translations available, we have been forced to recognize their uneven quality, f:specially when there is only one translation available and the translator's knowledge of English is obviously limited. Because all great art combines the universal and the particular specific to an individual culture, we have attempted to identify themes that are universally expressed, especially those regarding the human condition, and to suggest in the biographical sketch and again in the synopsis of the story those aspects that reflect the particular world from which the story originated. Similarly, our discussions attempt to provide a clear idea of the styles as well as the distinctive qualities of various representative writers from around the world. The comparisons that we have suggested for each story offer opportunities to enrich the experience of studying it. In addition to identifying and evaluating the various characteristics of a story, it is useful to develop analytical skills through comparison-contrast study. Teachers and students alike can engage in both critical analysis and interdisciplinary thinking. Ultimately, one can appreciate the value of extensive reading when one realizes that the experience of any story is enhanced by its juxtaposition to another and by its comparison or contrast with works in other genres, the visual arts, film, and xi" 14 TEACHING THE SHORT STORY music. This comparative methodology also demonstrates the universality of particular thematic content or techniques and provides a basis for contrast by which one can see why, how, and to what extent the different milieu, genre, or underlying assumptions account for the particular angle of vision or form of expression manifested in each work. The biographical material we include is designed to provide succinct information regarding the fundamental conditions of life, thought, and various religious, economic, and social experiences that have shaped the literary expression of the author. Particular attention is given to those writers whose biographical data may be limited or difficult to locate. We have organized the text by author and have included several indexes to enable teachers to select stories by title, country, English-language source, thematic and literary similarities, or comparable study with frequently anthologized and readily available literary and artistic works. To make Teaching the Short Story still more helpful to its readers, titles of works annotated in the text are capitalized wherever they appear. Ultimately, Teaching the Short Story is designed to entice teachers to work with the short stories represented here by providing a superior multicultural and comprehensive selection, presenting sufficient biographical background to enrich the stories, and suggesting comparative approaches both to the more familiar short stories of England and North America and to comparable works of art in other genres, all intended to suggest viable and creative avenues by which stories can be made relevant to each student's educational and personal experience. One of the most rewarding experiences in teaching the short story is discovering language with students, the language of symbol and metaphor capable of transmitting the human experience of the writer to the mind of a receptive reader. Selected to reflect the experience of its creator, it is a language capable of eliciting a fresh response from the reader and of making specific experiences in another time and placeor even a worldstand for a universal experience that can be shared with the immediacy and intensity of the original. The means of achieving success in this joint venture we leave to the individual instructor, who, according to the requirements of the world of the story and the abilities of the students, will analyze character, plot, point of view, setting, style, other narrative techMques, imagery, or tone with the primary goal of making students aware of both the universality of the message and the distinctive features and implications of various cultural backgrounds, backgrounds that are at once very different from our own, but at the same time an expression of a human experience that the reader can share. -RHM 15 x iv ANNOTATIONS 16 ABRAHAMS, PETER. EPISODE IN MALAY CAMP. South Africa Of Time and Place: Comparative World Literature in Translation. Glenview, IL: ScottForesman, 1976. And underground his white man respected boys him and asked him for his opinion before he did anything?' Returning to his own neighborhood ("It was all right here"), he joins a crowd in time to s.:!e a man in flight from the police fall from a roof. Xuma is amazed by the scene and by the sudden appearance of Dr. Mini, who is "dressed in the clothes of the white people and behaved like the white people?' Xuma helps Dr. Mini defy the police in order to carry the injured man into the doctor's house, which is "like the white people's place" and makes him uncomfortable, as does the doctor's wife, who is "almost white and ... was dressed like the white people." But Xuma stays for tea; the doctor wants him as a witness when the police arrive. In spite of t...
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