Coaching Handbook.docx - Coaching Handbook Coaching Handbook Fontane Wickizer PSYCH\/647 Brandy Benedict 1 Coaching Handbook Coaching is defined as an

Coaching Handbook.docx - Coaching Handbook Coaching...

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Coaching Handbook 1Coaching HandbookFontane WickizerPSYCH/647July 16, 2018Brandy Benedict
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Coaching HandbookCoaching is defined as an interactive process through which supervisors and managers within an organization help employees to develop their capabilities or solve performance problems. The main roles of coaching are to help the learner to improve, develop new skills, achieve goals, find personal success and to manage personal challenges. Coaching usually has a planned program having a shorter time frame as compared to mentoring. The goals of coaching tend to be set at or with the suggestion of the coach in advance. The coach possesses the primary ownership of the process while the candidate oversees the goal. Coaching encompasses one-on-one support for the learner. Most of the time, coaching process encompasses direct extrinsic feedback in a practical sense, for instance, the coach reports to the candidate what he or she has observed.Importance and Benefits of Employee Development“Every organization needs well-adjusted, trained, and experienced people to perform its activities” (DeCenzo, Robbins, & Verhulst, 2013). Employee training is defined as “present-oriented training that focuses on individual’s current jobs” (DeCenzo, Robbins, & Verhulst, 2013). Organizations can apply employee training utilizing two different methods, employee training and/or employee development. “Employee training is a learning experience: it seeks a relatively permanent change in employees to improve job performance” (DeCenzo, Robbins, & Verhulst, 2013). “Employee training is more present-day oriented; it focuses on individuals’ current jobs, enhancing those specific skills and abilities needed to immediately perform their jobs. For example, suppose you enter the job market during your senior year of college, pursuing a job as a marketing representative. Despite your degree in marketing, you will need some training. Specifically, you will need to learn the company’s policies and practices,
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product information, and other pertinent selling practices. This is job-specific training, or training designed to make you more effective in your current job” (DeCenzo, Robbins, & Verhulst, 2013).“Employee development, on the other hand, generally focuses on future jobs in the organization. As your job and career progress, you’ll need new skills and abilities. For example, if you become a sales territory manager, the skills you need to perform that job may be quite different from those you used to sell products. Now you must supervise sales representatives and develop a broad-based knowledge of marketing and specific management competencies in communication skills, evaluating employee performance, and disciplining problem individuals. As you are groomed for positions of
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