Home Grown Violent Extremists.docx - 1 Home Grown Violent Extremists Home Grown Violent Extremists Martin Peychev Arizona State University 2 Home Grown

Home Grown Violent Extremists.docx - 1 Home Grown Violent...

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1 Home Grown Violent Extremists Home Grown Violent Extremists Martin Peychev Arizona State University
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2 Home Grown Violent Extremists Eric Rudolph was a terrorist bomber from 1996 through 1998, during these years he was responsible for four bombs that detonated in Atlanta and Birmingham (“Eric Rudolph”, n.d.). Rudolph does identify as a homegrown violent extremist (HVE) due to the fact that a chunk of his radicalization came from the Christian Identify group. This group is known for its anti- sematic, racist, anti-government and overall high criminal rate (“Christian Identity, n.d.), Eric Rudolph was in contact with Dan Gayman, a leader of an Israeli church, and also a leader of the Christian Identity (Ross, 2005). Though modern day HVEs typically have a fascination, or an obsession with groups such as ISIS or Al-Qaida, Eric Rudolph’s radicalization came not from a Islamic belief, but from a white group, that was held as anti-sematic, and Eric Rudolph’s already negative beliefs about his country, and her citizens grew exponentially while being in contact with Dan Gayman (Ross, 2005). Lone-wolf terrorists are not anything to this day and age, there have been countless of lone-wolf incidents prior to the rise of terrorism against the United States. When ISIS was at their high-point, and their beliefs were perhaps more easily followed, hundreds of United States
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  • Summer '18
  • Eric Rudolph, Grown Violent Extremists

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