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Unformatted text preview: 1 Tilquanita Hammonds ENG/100 November 13, 2017 Amber Anaya 2 Thesis Statement: Some people are careless with their things like credit card and social security cards and even with their email don’t be a victim of fraud protect yourself. Credit Cards Credit card fraud is common today. You should never leave your credit card lying around. Never put your credit card number online always use a secondary credit card online if you do use your credit card online make sure it’s on a secure website. When shopping for an unsecured website identity thieves can intercept your personal information. Always have your cards in a safe place and don’t give your credit card number out over the phone you never know who is listening. Be careful at an ATM some identity thieves can install an additional device onto an existing ATM or credit card reader. This tool can read your credit card information, including your ATM or debit pin. Social security cards If a thief steals your social security number, he or she can cause a lot of problems in your life. They can destroy your credit, and you be able to own anything. You should never carry you're your social security in your purse or wallet it should always be in a safe place. If your social security gets stolen, you should contact Equifax or TransUnion to place a fraud alert on your credit file. If you think someone has taken your identity, you can order a free credit report. If someone steals your social security card, they can open financial accounts your social security number is the most critical piece of personal information a bank needs when it comes to expanding your credit. Always shred documents with your name and block electronic access to your social security account. 3 Emails People get hacked my there email every day. Your email id and its password are your confidential information don't share it. You should change your password at least once a month. You should always delete your emails daily. Don't log into a computer that is not yours still use a second email address. Take your computer offline and run a full virus on it. Some people think emails don't get hacked, but they do and its quite often and it's easy. Updating your computer will also help stop hackers make sure you have the latest internet chrome, or Firefox updated on your computer. No one likes being hacked I hope these tips will prevent you and me from being a victim. 4 References Bradford, B., Jackson, J., & Hough, M. (2013). Police futures and legitimacy: Redefining 'good policing'. hr J. Brown (Ed.), Future of policing (pp. 79-99). Oxon: Routledge. Brown, B., Benedict, R., & Wilkinson, W. V. (2006). Public perceptions of the police in Mexico: A case study. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, 29(1), 158-175. Chow, H. P. H. (2012). 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Barbara Cruikshank (1999) The Will to Empower: Democratic Citizens and Other Subjects, Cornell University Press. Hartley Dean, 'The Politics of Fraud' (1998) 21 Benefits 1. Hartley Dean and Margaret Melrose (1995) 'Fiddling the Social: Understanding Benefit Fraud' 14 Benefits 17. Hartley Dean and Margaret Melrose (1996) 'Unravelling Citizenship: The Significance of Social Security Benefit Fraud' 48 Critical Social Policy 3. 9 Hartley Dean and Margaret Melrose (1997) 'Manageable Discord: Fraud and Resistance in the Social Security System' 31 Social Policy and Administration 2. Hartley Dean and Margaret Melrose (2004) 'Popular Discourses and Moral Repertoires of Citizenship' 35 Critical Social Policy 79. Hartley Dean and Peter Taylor-Gooby (1992) Dependency Culture: The Explosion of a Myth, Harvester Wheatsheaf Jason de Parle (2004) American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids and a Nation 's Drive to End Welfare, Penguin. 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