Gender Stereotypes vs. Children - Huyler 1 Samantha Huyler Professor Raines ENGW 4 December 2017 Gender Stereotypes vs Children Children grow up with an

Gender Stereotypes vs. Children - Huyler 1 Samantha Huyler...

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Huyler 1 Samantha Huyler Professor Raines ENGW 4 December 2017 Gender Stereotypes vs. Children Children grow up with an image of their favorite hero that deeply idolize and strive to resemble as when they grow up . Little girls want to be like their favorite dainty, fragile, and beautiful princess who is rescued by her prince and lives happily ever after . An example of this type of fairy tale is The Little Mermaid where princess Ariel, a petite and beautiful red headed mermaid, dreams of having her happily ever after with Prince Eric. In order to fulfill her romantic dreams, Ariel gives up her charming singing voice, mermaid tail, and friends all for a man she just recently met. Opposite from a girl's perspective, boys yearn to be brave, masculine, tall, and charming all to win the princess's heart. For example, Hercules , the boy in this movie is clumsy and childish. Once the movie progresses he becomes strong, brave, and big in general. He also does everything he can for Meg, the damsel in distress. Disney does a fantastic job at having their characters fit these cookie cutter characteristics. In recent years, however, Disney is seeming to take a different approach. The traits that younger children cherish to have become insecurities as they grow older. Little boys and girls are growing up and looking in the mirror to find that they are not the perfect princes and princesses they have grown up seeing. Having these childhood fantasies have taught children gender stereotypes and how to compare themselves to others. Research studies are finding that these childhood movies are greatly influencing boys and
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Huyler 2 girls in today's society. The gender stereotypes children see in their favorite Disney movies are having great effects on their development. Gender stereotypes are certain expectations that are set by societies that distinguish the certain ways women and men are supposed to look and act. Parents might not even realize that they are reinforcing the gender stereotypes. According to Brewer, “gender stereotypes begin the second a baby’s gender is found out”. She elaborates more with the example the girls are usually given dolls and tea sets as toys. Parents are, without realizing, teaching their girls that they are supposed to “wear dresses, serve food, and take care of babies”. On the flip side, boys are brought up on toy trucks, action figures, and video games: “From the begining boys are taught to be tough, to be protective, and to defend themselves”(Brewer). When strolling through any toy isle in a store, the consumer will notice that there are “boy” and “girl” isles. The isles geared toward specific genders limit children to the toys they can play with. What if one little girl likes to play with cars and trucks? She may be made fun of because that is not a “girly toy” or her parents might even say no because that “is not for girls”. Society as a whole needs to be enlightened on the possible side effects of having their child conform to gender stereotypes. By
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