Syllabus (1) - Sociology 150 Social Psychology John Kaiser PhD UC Berkeley Summer 2018 This course introduces the major approaches issues and

Syllabus (1) - Sociology 150 Social Psychology John...

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Sociology 150 Social Psychology John Kaiser, PhD UC Berkeley Summer 2018 This course introduces the major approaches, issues, and debates within social psychology. It begins by exploring the foundational concepts in the field, emphasizing the nature of self, identity, meaning making, and social interaction. We then move through the major debates in a number of substantive areas, including emotions, driving in L.A., romantic relationships, social media and cell phones, obedience, conformity, status and stereotypes, medical school culture, high school reunions, automaticity and the psychological immune system, empathy, connection, and dancing. On this journey, we apply social psychological concepts to issues of inequality, such as race, class, gender, and ability. Likewise, we consider how power impacts interactions, behavior, and meaning making. A central goal is understanding the connection between individuals and society, especially how interactions shape macro-structures and vice-versa, and how this occurs through cognitive- emotional processes. How do people construct “reality” in social interactions? How do structures, institutions, and culture shape the contexts of those interactions? In what sense does “reality” exist beyond our individual perceptions in the cultures, structures, and institutions that order the social formation? Students should come away from this course with four core competencies: 1) the ability to read social psychology research articles; 2) the ability to think critically about social psychological theories and methods; 3) a general understanding of key findings and concepts in the major substantive areas; and 4) ability to apply social psychology in the field of everyday life. The first three competencies mainly require explicit knowledge gained through lectures and readings while the fourth requires the tacit knowledge gained through hands-on field studies. Note: Students who miss any of the first three classes may be dropped. Coursework and Grading Attendance and Participation .................................. 10% Meditation Journal…………………………………5% Observation Field Studies ....................................... 40% Midterm Exam ........................................................ 10% Final Exam .............................................................. 15% Final Paper .............................................................. 20% Attention: all assignments and instructions will be exchanged digitally through bCourses. When the deadline for submitting an assignment passes, you will no longer be able to access the instructions or submit your assignment. 1
Please do not ask for an extension on any of the assignments! Let the instructor know of any special circumstances that might affect your performance; however, do not ask for an extension or exemption from course policy. Although you may have a legitimate reason for making such a request, not all of your classmates— even those with more serious situations— necessarily feel entitled or comfortable enough to ask. Therefore, out of fairness and to avoid creating an awkward situation, please do not ask. The same goes for exams, so do not miss any.

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