Franz Liszt.pdf - Franz Liszt HUNGARIAN CREATIVE GENIUS General Information Birth Place Raiding Hungary Birthday Date Died Died In Bayreuth

Franz Liszt.pdf - Franz Liszt HUNGARIAN CREATIVE GENIUS...

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Unformatted text preview: Franz Liszt HUNGARIAN CREATIVE GENIUS General Information: Birth Place: Raiding, Hungary Birthday Date: October 22, 1811 Died: July 31, 1886 Died In: Bayreuth, Germany *Hungarian form of his name is Liszt Ferenc. Romantic Era ● Franz Liszt was born into the Classical and Romantic Era ● Classical Era = 1730 - 1820 ● Romantic Era = 1750 - 1870 ○ This was a period where ideas started to revolt against precise rules and laws Program Music ● ● Franz Liszt is the best known composer for program music Hector Berlioz helped mature the development of program music with his works, but Franz Liszt is far more important in the development. ○ Liszt surpasses Berlioz with a larger amount of originality and creativeness. ○ Liszt had new ideas, methods, procedures, proposed new problems, and created solutions to old problems he attempted. CREATIVE GENIUS ● ● ● ● ● Child prodigy Age nine, 1820, he made his debut as a pianist Classical and romantic era music style Age of ten, 1821, his father, Adam Liszt, took him abroad to seek proper artistic training in Vienna, Austria. Placed under Carl Czerny and Antonio Salieri, they taught him piano playing, harmony, and composition ● ● ● ● 1823, him and his father proceeded to Paris Liszt played in several towns on the way He had a concert of his own performed in Paris, at the age of fifteen Performed his concert in french provinces and England They Influenced Liszt... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Adam Liszt Ludwig van Beethoven Carl Czerny Heinrich Heine Charles Baudelaire ferdinando paër Anton Reicha Becoming The Best ● ● ● ● ● The results of studying with Czerny and Salieri were put to the test at two concerts, at which he played, on December 1, 1822, and April 13, 1823 He played Hummel's concertos in A minor and B minor. Also, he performed improvisation and created something spontaneously. He left the audience astonished and satisfied, especially Beethoven who gave him kisses after both concerts. He absorbed the legacy of Czerny, Salieri, and Beethoven Liszt became the greatest piano virtuoso Liszt... sustained social networks in Paris, England, Vienna, Weimar, Rome, Budapest, and more... The number of people he knew and influenced probably exceeds that of any other figure in the history of music. Illness & Melancholy ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● After the death of his father, August 1827, Liszt settled down in Paris as a piano teacher Soon after, he was ill for two years The virtuoso in him remained dormant for some time Concert-touring & compositions have been neglected for many years He felt his youth belonged to his father, as he threw him into the music world at such a young age “Franz Liszt lost interest in music to such a degree that he began to question his profession” The strict intensity of music wounded the feeling of love, art, and religion that Franz Liszt carried in his heart since a young boy, as he was very religious He felt like he was a slave to the art world Melancholy Pt. 2 ~ Quote ● ● “...premature melancholy began to weigh upon me, and I bore with an instinctive repugnance the ill-disguised degradation of the artistic servitude...” “...I, altogether unconscious of myself, of what I ought to aim at, and of the capacities that were allotted to me, allowed myself to be invaded by a bitter disgust with art, reduced as I saw it to a more or less lucrative handicraft, to an amusement for the use of good society, and I should have preferred being anything else rather than a musician in the pay of the grands seigneurs, patronized and salaried by them like a juggler or like the clever dog…” (From Franz Liszt, 1837, Lettre d'un Bachelier ès Musique: à un poète voyageur). Contributions to Recovery ● ● After his illness he started reflecting on work, incidents of career, and his development as an artist Five major events brought him an artistic revolution ○ The French Revolution of 1830 sparked his motivation and aroused his lack of energy ○ Paganini’s arrival in Paris, March 1831 ○ Chopin's arrival in Paris, soon after Paganini’s in autumn 1831 ○ Second performance of Berlioz Symphonie fantastique, with other compositions, on December 9, 1832 ○ Liszt married Marie d'Agoult is 1834 “He was on a quest to discover his creative essence, a new artistic identity.” INSPIRED ● ● ● Result of these combined events/influences = Liszt created, within a few years, a new pianoforte style Transcriptions were his main output as a composer, but from 1834 he produced his original pianoforte compositions in a programmatic style 1839 - 1847 Liszt toured all over Europe, and was very successful Franz Liszt - Liebestraum 1850 Another Female Influence ~ 1847 Liszt remarried to Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein. Her influence on him was dramatic and powerful. She encouraged him to stop touring, so he could teach and compose, instead. Also, so he could have a more domestic life with her. She had a revolutionary effect on his career and development as an artist. She ended his career as a virtuoso, and opened his career as a composer of symphonic, solo, and choral vocal works. Creation of New Musical Forms ● ● ● ● 1848 -1858 = most famous achievement was creation of symphonic poem Definition of symphonic poem: a type of orchestral musical piece that illustrates or evokes a poem, a story, a painting, or other nonmusical source picturesque music effect the soul of listener with all the resources of the orchestra The program has no other object than to indicate the moments which compelled the composer to create his work, the thoughts which he tried to incorporate in it. The program also helps guard the hearer against random poetical interpretation, and at advance tell them the poetical idea/point as a whole. “We are told that he, 'transports his hearers with him to ideal regions, which he leaves the imagination of every individual free to conceive and adorn. In such a case it is very dangerous to wish to impose on our neighbour the same scenes and series of thoughts to which our imagination feels itself transported. Here everyone should be allowed to enjoy silently his revelations and visions.” July 31, 1886 ● ● ● ● Franz Liszt closed his long, eventful, and truly artistic career at Bayreuth, Germany on July 31, 1886 He has achieved a lot throughout his lifetime. He was a piano virtuoso, composer, teacher, conductor, organist, philanthropist, author, these all are of lasting significance. Liszt's new works inspired eager pupils to seek his guidance. For the next 10 years, Liszt's radical and innovative works found their way into the concert halls of Europe, winning him followers and opponents. WORK CITED Programme music in the last four centuries; a contribution to the history of musical expression : Niecks, Frederick, 1845-1924 : Free Download & Streaming. (1970, January 01). Retrieved from Franz Liszt (1911): James Huneker ... - amazon.com. (n.d.). Retrieved from ; h=RLJPc6z03PBIqzAFziX1WowT7MbZApt0wX92OU_kn90&v=1&r= 8862990&p=DevEx,5082.1 Front Matter edited by Christopher H. Gibbs and Dana Gooley; in Liszt and His World (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006), 0-20 ntity%7Cdocument%7C886654 PART I: ESSAYS: Liszt, Italy, and the Republic of the Imagination written by Anna Harwell Celenza; edited by Christopher H. Gibbs and Dana Gooley; in Liszt and His World (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006), 23-58 entity|document|886655 PART II: BIOGRAPHICAL DOCUMENTS: Liszt on the Artist in Society written by Ralph P. Locke and Franz Liszt, 1811-1886; edited by Christopher H. Gibbs and Dana Gooley; in Liszt and His World (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006), 311-322 _entity|document|886662 ...
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