RESEARCH DOC.edited.docx - Running head FOLLOW-UP ASTHMA CARE 1 A Systemic Review of Follow-up after Acute Asthma Episodes Improving Pediatric Outcomes

RESEARCH DOC.edited.docx - Running head FOLLOW-UP ASTHMA...

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Running head: FOLLOW-UP ASTHMA CARE 1 A Systemic Review of Follow-up after Acute Asthma Episodes Improving Pediatric Outcomes Author’s Name Institution of Affiliation Date of Submission
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FOLLOW-UP ASTHMA CARE 2 Introduction Background and Significance Asthma is among one of the most common childhood diseases. Current data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that an estimated 9.3% of adolescents between the ages of 11-21 have been diagnosed with asthma at some point (CDC, 2016). Furthermore, the CDC data shows that highest rates of asthma are found most commonly in disadvantaged populations and those with a lower socioeconomic household (Center for Disease Control, 2016). Its impacts are wide-ranging and impact the entire health care system and daily patient life. An Environmental Protection Agency Report from 2017 shows that poor asthma control was listed as a direct cause of approximately over 14.7 million missed school days (Environmental Protection Agency, 2017). Further negative impacts place the strain on the entire health-care and school systems (Bosnic-Anticevich, Stuart, Mackson, Cvetkovski, Sainsbury, Armour, Mavritsakis, Mendrela, Travers-Mason, & Williamson, 2014). For many patients achieving good asthma control can be particularly challenging. This difficulty can be traced to multiple factors, which include health care system failures. These failures result in a lack of patient compliance, clinician inability to follow established treatment guidelines, and lack of primary care buy-in regarding patient education. Previous research has shown that properly followed established treatment guidelines result in better rates of asthma control rates for most populations. These guidelines include proper primary prevention and post emergency room care. Furthermore, it is expected that implementation of treatment guidelines could result in 95% of patients with well-controlled asthma (Clayton, 2014).
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FOLLOW-UP ASTHMA CARE 3 Systematic Review The aim of this systematic review is to review the current state of the science regarding pediatric asthma management after an emergency room visit for an episode of acute exacerbation. Current research has shown conflicting evidence whether having early access to primary after an emergency room reduces rates of recidivism. Other findings show that many asthma patients do not return for a primary follow-up visit even when having universal access to care, which may further exacerbate the problem of poorly, controlled asthma (Li, To, Guttman, 2012). To further study the scope of the problem and current research regarding this or any other potential research problem one must perform a systematic review of current literature. A systematic review is essential to determine what research has already been done, what findings are available, and help identify areas that require further research to understand the topic at hand entirely. Furthermore, systematic reviews can help narrow and limit the scope of the research
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