PICOT.docx - Running head REDUCING COMPASSION FATIGUE AMONG ED NURSES PICOT Reducing Compassion Fatigue Among Emergency Department Nurses PICOT

PICOT.docx - Running head REDUCING COMPASSION FATIGUE AMONG...

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Running head: REDUCING COMPASSION FATIGUE AMONG ED NURSES: PICOT 1 Reducing Compassion Fatigue Among Emergency Department Nurses: PICOT Statement Grand Canyon University Professional Capstone and Practicum NRS-490 April 14, 2017
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REDUCING COMPASSION FATIGUE AMONG ED NURSES: PICOT 2 Introduction Reducing Compassion Fatigue Among Emergency Department Nurses: Problem Identification “A careful nurse will keep a constant watch over her sick” (Nightingale, 1898, p. 17). In writing these powerful words, Florence Nightingale set the stage for nurses and compassion fatigue (CF). CF has a profound impact in nurses and is a growing problem in many Emergency Departments (EDs) and other hospital units. As nurses’ we perform a number procedures throughout the day, but essentially the one thing delivered the most, is oneself” (Harris & Quinn- Griffin, 2015). “Compassion is an empathetic awareness of another’s distress, combined with a desire to alleviate it” (Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, n.d.). “Fatigue is defined as physical and/or mental depletion that can be caused by stress, medication, overwork or mental and physical illness or disease” (The medical dictionary: The free dictionary online, 2011) ED nurses work in a continuously stressful environment; adding in overcrowding, a few code blues, a cerebral vascular accident and a few myocardial infarctions, and it compounds adding secondary traumatic stress to the mix. Nurses provide not only care, but also kindness, and tenderness to patients, families, other nurses; support to doctors and advanced practitioners, and give directions to medical technicians, nursing assistants and other staff every day. Eventually, the nurse can have their internal well of compassion run dry, leaving them with the ever-dreaded CF. Simply stated, “CF is the inability for nurses to nurture patients due to secondary traumatic stress disorder” (Hinderer et al., 2014). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background and significance of CF while outlining a clinical question to guide topic inquiry.
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COMPASSION FATIGUE AND THE ED NURSE 3 Background Emergency nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding subset of overall nursing. Not that other areas of nursing are less so; but the quick pace, highly emotional and challenging environment of the ED is a stressful one. Add patients with life threating illnesses and injuries, family members with their emotions and three more new patients, a nurse is strained from the minute the shift begins. “Maintaining this extreme level of stress for a 12-hour shift, repeatedly exposed to traumatic events, nurses might begin to notice that it can affect their health and job performance” (Braunschneider, 2013). An average of 86% of ED nurses had moderate to high levels of CF at some time or another (Hooper, Craig, Janvrin, Wetsel, & Reimels, 2010). The result of CF can make the nurse become ineffective at the job, depressed, and detached. One study shows that there is up to 43% of nurses who expressed emotional numbness, 55% of nurses
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