Fall 2016 intro syllabus final (5).docx - Introduction to Expository Writing Expository Writing Program Fall 2016 AEM Brodsky PhD Senior Lecturer EWP

Fall 2016 intro syllabus final (5).docx - Introduction to...

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Introduction to Expository Writing Expository Writing Program Fall 2016 AEM Brodsky, PhD Office Hours: Mon 10am-12pm Senior Lecturer, EWP Mon-Fri by appointment [email protected] Office: Gilman 46 410-516-8146 Mailbox: Gilman 4 Introduction to Expository Writing Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. General texts Your own writing and other students’ writing Gordon Harvey, Writing with Sources Diana Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual, 6 th ed. (not a required text) Academic Essays Martha Nussbaum, “Teaching Patriotism: Love and Critical Freedom” Abstracts from various disciplines Literary Essays EB White, “The Ring of Time” David Sedaris, “Repeat After Me” Annie Dillard, “Living Like Weasels” Other literary essays tba Critical sources Short Stories Ursula LeGuin, “The Ones Who Walk Away from the Omelas” BJ Novak, “War” Stuart Dybek, “Between” ZZ Packer, “Brownies” Other short stories tba Critical sources
The course Welcome. In Introduction to Expository Writing you will first work on reading and summarizing complex written texts. Next, you will learn to analyze these texts. And finally, you will use analysis to make arguments about them. Our work this semester will be divided into three major writing projects: a summary (one page) and two essays (each 6-8 pages). We’ll work up to each final draft through a series of writing assignments that will guide the process of reading, writing, thinking—and rereading, rethinking, and rewriting. Each sequence builds on the one(s) before it, and assignments within each sequence build on each other as well. This course focuses on the concepts and skills most crucial to reading and writing academic essays, in any field. Toward that end, we’ll draw from sources from a range of disciplines. You will use the issues raised by those readings as a springboard for writing; the process of writing, in turn, will help you think more clearly and conversantly about those issues. This is not a course in English grammar or in writing proper sentences or coherent paragraphs.

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