Thermodynamics Subject Outline.pdf - SUBJECT OUTLINE 48651...

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Chemistry for Engineering Students
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Chapter 10 / Exercise 10.76
Chemistry for Engineering Students
Brown/Holme
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SUBJECT OUTLINE 48651 Thermodynamics Subject coordinator A/Prof Guang Hong Email: [email protected] Teaching staff If you wish to discuss your questions or need further help in the subject, please see the lecturer during consultation hours. If you are unable to come then, please try other times when the lecturer is available. Email and phone messages will not be responded to, except for urgent matters. The following are contact details: A/Prof Guang Hong Email: [email protected] Office: CB11.09.114 Phone: +61 2 9514 2678 Consultation times : Tuesday 4:00pm-5:00pm. Thursday 2:00pm-3:00pm. Subject description The objectives of this subject are to develop a fundamental understanding of applied thermodynamics from an engineering perspective, lay the groundwork for subsequent studies in the fields related to energy systems, and increase an awareness and emphasis on energy resources and environmental issues. Topics include thermodynamic properties of pure substances, work and heat, the first law of thermodynamics, applications to closed systems, applications to open systems, the second law of thermodynamics, irreversibility, entropy, Rankine cycle and steam engines, refrigeration cycle, Brayton cycle and gas turbine engines, Otto cycle and spark ignition engines, and diesel cycle and compression ignition engines. Subject learning objectives (SLOs) Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to: 1. determine the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. 2. apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics in an engineering perspective. 3. recognize the differences between the ideal and real processes and power cycles, understand how to apply the first and the second laws to analyse them, and determine the thermal efficiency. 4. formulate the basic models necessary to study, analyze, and design thermal systems and understand the basic methods to increase the thermal efficiency. Course area UTS: Engineering Delivery Autumn 2017; City Subject classification Fields of practice: Mechanical Engineering program Credit points 6cp Requisite(s) 33230 Mathematical Modelling 2 AND ( 68037 Physical Modelling OR ( 68042 Physical Modelling A AND 68043 Physical Modelling B)) Result type Grade and marks 20/02/2017 (Autumn 2017) © University of Technology Sydney Page 1 of 10
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Chemistry for Engineering Students
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Chapter 10 / Exercise 10.76
Chemistry for Engineering Students
Brown/Holme
Expert Verified
Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies: Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.), which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5 (A.5) Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 (B.1) Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2 (C.1)

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