Human Rights Essay.docx - Criminal and survivor can be used...

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Criminal and survivor can be used to describe both Wiesel and Anthony, although they have never met each other they voiced the same ideas in the speeches “The Perils of Indifference” and “On Women's Right to Vote” given their many differences. Both Wiesel and Anthony promoted equality in their time periods due to the oppression and indifference they both suffered. Yet only one was able to experience the justice of equality in their life while the other did not get the chance to see it. Although the speeches are years apart, their similarities manifest in how Wiesel and Anthony speak out against indifference and use a tone of strength and understanding. The difference in the speeches are in how Wiesel was freed while Anthony was still fighting for her rights. The similarities I found in Wiesel and Anthony speeches is the indifference that they both faced during their lifetime, and how it was manifested in their speeches. At the time of Anthony’s speech she is being indicted for illegally voting at the last presidential election. Anthony is defending herself in her speech to let people know that she had every right as a United State citizen to exercise her right to vote (Anthony 1872). When talking about the United States of America Anthony states “It is an odious aristocracy; a hateful oligarchy of sex; the most hateful aristocracy ever established on the face of the globe; an oligarchy of wealth, where the rich govern the poor” (Anthony, 1872). In Wiesel speech he remembers the abandonment he felt in the ghettos and death camps while he waited to be freed. Wiesel states “Indifference is always the friend of the enemy, for it benefits the aggressor never his victims, whose pain is magnified when he or she feels forgotten” (Wiesel, 1999). He thought that there was no way in the world other could know what was happening in Europe and not do anything about it. Wiesel remembers “Our only miserable consolation was that we believed that Auschwitz and Treblinka were closely guarded secrets; that the leaders of the free world did not know what was going on behind those black gates and barbed wire; that they had no knowledge of the war against Jews that Hitler’s armies and their accomplices wage as part of the war against the Allies” (Wiesel, 1999). In Wiesel speech he states

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