GRAMMAR REVISION BOOKLET.docx - GRAMMAR REVISION Sentence...

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GRAMMAR REVISION Sentence Word Order The word order of a sentence that is not a command or a question. S ubject V erb O bject (Adverbials) M anner (how) P lace (where) T ime ( when ) I bought a scarf today S V O M P T Example: A new swimming record Anne has set yesterday. Answer: (S ) Anne ( V ) has set (O) a new swimming record (T) yesterday. Task.1. If necessary, rewrite each sentence using a capital letter and mark each rewritten sentence with S, V, O, M, P, T as in the example. 1. the paper she threw in the bin last night She threw the paper in the bin last night __________________________________________________________________________________ 2. in February my trimester begins My trimester begins in February 3. on this shelf this morning I left my purse mistakenly I left my purse on this shelf mistakenly this morning __________________________________________________________________________________ 4. woke me up the phone in the middle of the night The phone woke me up in the middle of the night __________________________________________________________________________________ 5. she accepted the invitation with a smile. __________________________________________________________________________________
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A simple sentence is a complete clause which contains a subject and a verb. A compound sentence includes two or more simple (independent clauses) sentences joined together by a conjunction – and, and then, but, for , nor, or, so, yet. The joining of two or more core ideas (independent clauses) is called co- ordination. 1. We can use co-ordinating conjunctions to show - Addition (and) - Continuation (and then) - Contrast (but, yet) - Choice (or) - Result (so) - Reason (for) - 2. We DO NOT put a comma in front of ‘an’ or ‘and’, but we often use it in front of other co-ordinating conjunctions. 3. When the subject is the same in all parts of the sentence, we do not usually repeat it. However, we do when using ‘so’ and ‘for’. Task 2. Join these simple sentences together to make compound sentences using co-ordinating conjunctions. a. Your sister called last night. She did not leave a message. (but) _____________________________________________________________________________ b. I do not know what happened to her. I do not care. (and) ______________________________________________________________________________ c. I took the computer back to the shop0-. I complained about it. (and) _______________________________________________________________________________ d. The old lady was nervous. She was not used to strangers calling late at night. (because) ______________________________________________________________________________ e. The taxi stopped at the lights. Three ladies got out of it. (so)
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TRANSITIONS ( OR CONNECTIVES) These connect and progress ideas in a logical sequence. Academic writing relies on the use of transitions to show a logical progression of ideas to achieve credible argumentation. When connecting two independent clauses (simple sentences), together with a transition, a semicolon and a comma, or a full stop and a comma may be used. Transitions Writer’s Purpose Transitional words or phrases To: Add an idea In addition, furthermore, moreover, also, besides To: Show time or sequence Meanwhile, first, second, then, next, later, finally To: Contrast However, nevertheless, in contrast, on the other hand To: Show result Therefore, thus, consequently, as a result To: Emphasise or expand In fact, of course, indeed, certainly, besides To: Provide an example For example, for instance To: Generalise or summarise In general, overall, in short, in conclusion, in summary To: Contradict On the contrary Task 3. Determine the relationship between each of the two simple sentences and choose an appropriate transition to connect them.
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  • Summer '17
  • mani
  • Animal Farm , Grammatical tense, Independent Clause, Dependent clause, Grammatical number, Raimes

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