Quantitative research critique FORYS.doc - RUNNING HEAD...

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RUNNING HEAD: QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 1 Quantitative Research Critique and Ethical Considerations Amanda Forys Grand Canyon University: NRS-433V August 12, 2018
QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 2 Quantitative Research Critique and Ethical Considerations In today's acute care settings, there are many healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) that have became endemic and are difficult to treat. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed numerous precautions to prevent transmission of organisms between patients including hand hygiene methods and isolation precautions that require strict adherence by all healthcare professionals (Climo et al., 2013). In order to evaluate more effective methods at preventing infections, there have been numerous studies regarding the use of chlorhexidine- containing products that could significantly reduce the rates of patients that acquire bloodstream infections and multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). This paper will focus on critically analyzing the article, “Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing-Effect on Healthcare-associated BSI and MDRO Acquisition” by Climo et al. (2013). This aim will be achieved by critiquing the research problem, data collection methods, sampling technique, data analysis, ethical considerations, and results of the study. Background of Study Healthcare-associated infections are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates as well as substantial excess in costs that are no longer being covered by Medicaid or Medicare (Climo et al., 2013). According to Climo et al. (2013), hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) can be significantly reduced with targeted interventions that include chlorhexidine-containing products. Numerous studies have proven that the risk of infection is decreased during central venous catheter insertions with the standardization of insertion-site antisepsis; however it remains controversial if patient bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate can prevent healthcare-associated infections (Climo et al., 2013). Since chlorhexidine gluconate is an effective antiseptic agent against organisms such as S. aureus and enterococcus
QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 3 species, it has residual antibacterial properties that can reduce the microbial burden on patient's skin (Climo et al., 2013).

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