Qualitative research critique FORYS.doc - RUNNING HEAD QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE Qualitative Research Critique Amanda Forys Grand Canyon University

Qualitative research critique FORYS.doc - RUNNING HEAD...

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RUNNING HEAD: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 1Qualitative Research CritiqueAmanda ForysGrand Canyon University: NRS-433VAugust 5, 2018
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 2Qualitative Research CritiqueEach year, approximately 722,000 patients in the United States develop a hospital-acquired infection (HAI) that leads to increased mortality, morbidity, and medical costs (Musuuza, Roberts, Carayon, & Safdar, 2017). Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) have been found to be at a higher risk due to their lower immune system and can develop secondary infections such as Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, ventilator use infections, surgical site infections, and infections from central venous catheters (Johns Hopkins Medicine, n.d.). These infections can become difficult to treat or cause serious complications and death, but nurses can prevent them with practicing precautions by incorporating antiseptic soaps to reduce infections. There has been numerous research relating to prevention of HAIs, and this paper will critique a qualitative research study from the article, “Assessing the sustainability of daily chlorhexidine bathing in the intensive care unit of a Veteran's Hospital by examining nurses' perspectives and experiences” written by Jackson S. Musuuza, Tonya J. Roberts, Pascale Carayon and Nasia Safdar. This paper will address the problem statement, purpose of the study, research method, data collection, ethical considerations, data analysis, and its effect on the quality of work by the nurses' perspectives and experiences.BackgroundThe high rates of HAIs in the United States has been a cause for concern as 75,000 people die each year and costs the healthcare system $9.8 billion annually (Musuuza, Roberts, Carayon, & Safdar, 2017). It has been stated that there needs to be sustainability of effective interventions in nursing practice in order to reduce the burden of HAIs on patient's health and economic factors (Musuuza, Roberts, Carayon, & Safdar, 2017). Although chlorhexidine gluconate bathing (CHG) has been proven in previous studies to reduce healthcare-associated
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 3bloodstream infections, there is no sustainability of the intervention amongst nursing staff. Also, CHG daily bathing has not been studied using implementation research and this type of research is “critically needed to facilitate translation of evidence into practice” (Musuuza, Roberts, Carayon, & Safdar, 2017, para. 3). In order for successful adoption of CHG bathing as an intervention amongst nursing, it was stated that factors that affect this practice need to be understood.

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