Chapter 37-39 - Chapter 27 Plant Nutrition Book Notes...

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Chapter 27 Plant Nutrition Book Notes Plants derive most of their organic mass from the CO 2 of air but they also depend on soil nutrients such as water and minerals
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Macronutrients and Micronutrients o More than 50 chemical elements have been identified among the inorganic substances in plants, but not all of these are essential o A chemical element is considered essential if it is required for a plant to complete a life cycle o The most common deficiencies are those of nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus Nitrogen Limited o Plants require nitrogen as a component of Proteins, Nucleic Acids, Chlorophyll, and other important molecules Adaptations to Acquire Nitrogen o Two types of relationships plants have with other organisms are mutualistic Symbiotic nitrogen fixation Mycorrhizae The Role of Bacteria in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation o Symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria provide some plant species with a built-in source of fixed nitrogen o From an agricultural standpoint the most important and efficient symbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria occur in the legume family (peas, beans, and other similar plants) Soil bacteria and Nitrogen Availability o Nitrogen-fixing bacteria convert atmospheric N 2 to nitrogenous minerals that plants can absorb as a nitrogen source for organic synthesis o Along a legumes possessive roots are swellings called nodules, which are composed of plant cells that have been “infected” by nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and Agriculture o Crop rotation, a non-legume such as maize is planted one year, and the following year a legume is planted to restore the concentration of nitrogen in the soil Fertilizers o Commercially produced fertilizers contain minerals that are either mined or prepared by industrial processes
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o “Organic” Fertilizers are composed of manure, fishmeal, or compost
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Chapter 38 Plant Reproduction Book Notes Structure of the Mature Seed
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This note was uploaded on 03/25/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Mets during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M University-Galveston.

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Chapter 37-39 - Chapter 27 Plant Nutrition Book Notes...

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