week 5 dp 2 patho.docx - Progression of Anaphylactic Shock An anaphylactic reaction is a hypersensitive exaggerated rapidly occurring reaction that

week 5 dp 2 patho.docx - Progression of Anaphylactic Shock...

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Progression of Anaphylactic Shock An anaphylactic reaction is a hypersensitive, exaggerated, rapidly occurring reaction, that occurs in response to a previously encountered antigen. Severe reactions may cause vascular collapse that results in systemic shock, and potentially death (Huether & McCance, 2017). Anaphylactic reactions occur after the initial exposure to the antigen has taken place. Upon the first exposure to an antigen, the immune system reacts by producing IgE antibodies inside the lymph nodes and is enhanced by Helper T cells. Antibodies then bind to membrane receptors that are located on mast cells within connective tissues. The next time the individual comes in contact with the specific antigen, the IgE antibodies recognize the antigen as a foreign substance and activate a cascade of potent chemical mediators. Common antigens are found in foods, insect venom, and sulfites (Huether & McCance, 2017). The purpose of this discussion is to explain the physiological progression that occurs in anaphylaxis, describe the severity of cases that would require transfer to higher level of care, and to explain how age and gender impact anaphylactic shock. Referring Patients for Emergency Care Rapid diagnosis and emergent care is necessary to prevent fatalities in anaphylactic cases (Reber, Hernandez, & Galli, 2017). Early onset of anaphylaxis may be nonspecific and manifest in a variety of ways. The patient experiencing the initial signs of anaphylaxis may respond physically with increased weakness, pruritus, sneezing, or sweating.
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