Communication Strategy Draft Word flo.docx - 1 PURPOSE AND...

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Unformatted text preview: 1. PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND The National Hospital Insurance Fund’s (NHIF) strategic plan puts emphasis on the importance of expansion of coverage especially in the informal sector through stakeholder engagement and partnerships. Effective, integrated and coordinated communication thus becomes a very important aspect in carrying out NHIF’s goal of growing its membership base while retaining the existing ones and growing its revenue. The purpose of this communication strategy is to ensure NHIF meets its goals by sharing NHIF mission, values and vision with both internal and external publics. The strategy focuses on the growth and retention of the informal sector mainly through enhanced communication and public education. The strategy further focuses on increased internal corporate communication to ensure that messages shared within the fund resonate. The overall focus is to enhance the NHIF brand through increased top of mind awareness and brand association through numerous communication models that increase positive messages across the board. NHIF has made a significant investment to meet the growing need for information from increasing capacity to improved integration of available communication channels including media relations, social and online communications, branding, visual communications, and health and emergency risk communications. The Fund needs all employees to understand and use communications effectively to achieve programmatic goals. The output of the communication strategy would be as a result of developing an appropriate approach and plan for the Financial Year (FY) based on stakeholder needs and requirements. The strategy outlines the main communication objectives, the main target groups identified, the messages that will be communicated to the target groups and channels that will be deployed. The strategy outlines the communication plan for the FY with methods of performance evaluation. 2. GOAL, OBJECTIVES AND DECISION MAKERS 2.1 GOAL A Baseline survey on customer awareness levels (NHIF, 2016) puts the overall awareness index at 57.9%. 76.3% are staff, 70.3% are healthcare workers and 27.3%, the external customer. This survey was done around a time when there was a massive recruitment and education campaign for supa cover. This goes to show that more need to be done in terms of public education and sensitization of stakeholders especially on the benefit package and other NHIF attributes. THE main goal of this strategy thus becomes; To provide accurate, timely, understandable, actionable and relevant information to key audiences to prompt action to take up health insurance cover for the betterment of individual or group’s health across the country. All communications that will be made by NHIF staff across the board (from head office, regional and branch office level) will be to ensure that there is behaviour change amongst the population due to deeper understanding of the importance of taking up health insurance. This in turn ensures that the burden of catastrophic health expenditure which drives many people into poverty is reduced. 2.2 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES * To standardize communication process and information within and from the Fund * To increase the level of knowledge and awareness of NHIF benefits among all stakeholders * To enhance the Fund’s strategic purchasing power through engagement with Healthcare Providers (HCPs) and development partners * To influence policy makers and opinion leaders to advocate for NHIF resulting in an enabling environment 2.3 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS The strategy will focus on communicating to and with key audiences (stakeholders) as decision makers. The decision makers have the power to influence or change the Fund’s way of operating based on their interest. A decision maker in this strategy can say YES or NO to the above objectives. Therefore, the decision maker is very critical in guiding the choices of who the key target audience will be. An analysis below gives a clear picture of the importance of each decision maker , the level of influence and their level of interest and how each will be engaged. Table 1: stakeholder analysis 1. Individuals (members) NHIF membership for individuals is on voluntary basis. An individual makes decisions about their own health and that of their families. An individual makes the choice to purchase a health insurance cover, to seek medical care in a hospital, decides whether to declare their dependents or not among many other decisions. Their level of understanding of issues play a critical role in the decision making. The above analysis puts members at an important tier. Members have both high level of influence and interest. The best approach therefore will be to collaborate and empower them with enough information so as to be able to make informed decisions. 2. Health care providers (HCPs) NHIF works with accredited healthcare providers who make decisions about screening, diagnostics, treatment, and recommendations for patients. They play a critical role in shaping the opinion about NHIF to the public. The manner in which they will handle members largely influences the decision they will make and their behaviour towards NHIF. HCPs therefore have high interest and influence as a decision maker therefore this group need to be empowered. Collaboration is also essential. 3. NHIF staff This is one group which can make or break the organization as they make decisions about programmes, coordination, human and financial resources, and how they speak to external partners and colleagues about NHIF. Just like members and HCPs, their level of interest as well as influence is high. This group need to be empowered with enough information. 4. Policy-makers Policy makers are critical decision makers at any level be it national, County or sub-county levels as they have the responsibility for their residents’ health. The policies they will implement have direct impact on NHIF operations and its ability to thrive. Their level of influence is high, with low interest level. The best approach will be to ensure that their needs and concerns are understood and considered. This group need to be consulted and involved in decision making in matters concerning the Fund’s operations. 5. Development partners This group is important as they make decisions about funding and implementing health programmes such as assisting countries in health systems strengthening, funding programmes to reduce poverty due to out-of-pocket expenditure on health care services among others. This group need information as their level of influence is low as well as their interests. 3. CONTEXT ANALYSIS This strategy will scan both the internal and external environment to determine factors that may or already influence the communication efforts. It will look at the SWOT analysis and situation analysis. 3.1 Situation analysis According to Research on Health financing 2016, the cost of healthcare is still very high as a result pushing many households into poverty due to out-of-pocket expenditure. Despite existence of NHIF as a solution to this problem, there is still a lot that need to be done to bring as many Kenyans as possible on board. A baseline survey on customer awareness carried out in 2016 indicates clearly that there is lack of deeper understanding and low levels of awareness of NHIF benefits and other basic information. It puts awareness levels index at 57%. Staff awareness came out wanting in the survey indicating the need to develop a communication strategy that both addresses the internal and external audience in equal measure. While there is good will amongst the publics on NHIF brand, the survey indicated that factors such as poor quality of services offered in healthcare facilities demeans efforts made by the Fund. Thus the need for this strategy to offer solutions such as intensified public education through utilization of various communication channels to reach as many people as possible. Other solutions to be addressed by this strategy includes design and implementation of corporate communication campaigns that are sustainable, development and updating of information & education materials and promotional materials to assist in public education as well as forge a good working relations with stakeholders through engagement. 3.2 SWOT Analysis 3.3 strategic considerations The environmental scan indicates that the debate on health insurance has already kicked off. Therefore this strategy need to fortify and amplify the importance of enrolling for membership in NHIF through public education and seamless internal and external communication efforts. The strategy will answer the following questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. WHY engage, inform and educate WHO to engage, inform and educate WHEN to engage, inform and educate WHERE to engage, inform and educate HOW to engage, inform and educate The strategy will also put into consideration the following; a. Government recognizes NHIF as a vehicle through which it will attain Universal Health Coverage (UHC). As such, the communication strategy will focus on policy advocacy as well as influence of personal decisions to purchase NHIF cover through behaviour change. b. There is no one-size- fit-all approaches and messages. The strategy shall apply media mix approach c. It will also consider the heterogeneous cultural and value systems compounded with diverse demographic, educational, income factors d. Low literacy levels vis a vis increased use of media and mobile phones will also be taken into account. 4. TARGET AUDIENCE (TA) Based on stakeholder analysis, this strategy will stratify target audiences into three categories. 1. Primary audience 2. Secondary audience and 3. Tertiary audience It is important to note that this strategy will use the term decision maker and target audience interchangeably. 1. Primary audience(decision maker) The TA here has high level of influence and high level of interest in NHIF issues. The TA is identified as; - NHIF Member (individual or employed) NHIF staff Health Care Provider (HCP) 2. Secondary audience The TA has either high level of influence and low interest or high level of interest and low level of influence. This TA need to be involved and consulted. The TA is identified thus; - Opinion leaders - church leaders, village elders, trade unions leadership, County government County Commissioner’s office 3. Tertiary audience The TA has both low influence and interest. However, the TA need to be informed. - Development partners Approach Target summary TA 1 Employed member: Formal sector workers (3055), full time employees, with a large network of close family and friends, and connections. Have family of TA2 Opinion leaders - Shape the believe and behavior of the decision maker(primary target) TA3 Development partners - Works mostly with the national government their own, deducted salary monthly into NHIF, and usually have private sector insurance as well. - Mostly trusted by the primary TA Champions for the rights of the TA Demographics Middle class, urban/periurban. Individual member 18-29 years, blue collar workers, married with 1-3 children, educated to secondary school level and earning a salary of approximately Ksh. 15,00020,000 per month. Demographics Live in urban/peri-urban as well as rural areas Perceived benefit and barriers for behaviour - - Provides funding and technical support to projects towards health financing County Government - develops and implements policies that can directly affect the decision maker - has responsibility to provide quality and accessible healthcare for its people HCP Accredited by NHIF Offers either out-patient or in-patient services Situated in urban or rural areas County Commissioner’s structure - Have direct link to the decision maker - Trusted Employed: They feel NHIF is inefficient, they would never use it themselves, but they wouldn’t mind recommending to others (because it helps free them financially from the burden of assisting friends and family for medical care). • Individual: Worried about the burden that illness and serious injury would place on their limited household budget. Motivated to sign up for NHIF’s voluntary scheme to cover their family. Have experienced first-hand the benefits of NHIF. • HCP Understands the importance of being accredited by NHIFs. But at times clouded by greed hence poor services to members Not trusting that NHIF will pay out claims on time Knows NHIF can help the population and release them from the burden of having to fund raise or assist those in need of medical aid financially - Potential for partnership but worried about the manner in which the funding or support will be utilized • Staff Believes in the brand. However, receives the information last after the public. Doesn’t have full details to enable effective communication of the same 4.1 TA Primary TA Key messages Individual/employed member 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Seconda ry TA The benefits package Enrollment processes Payment modes The cost Access points (both NHIF service outlets and accredited facilities) County Government 1. Importance of having an health insurance cover 2. The benefit package 3. Rationale, objectives and structure of NHIF Tertiary TA Development partners 1. Importance of NHIF as a vehicle through which the government will attain UHC 2. Rationale, Key message HCP 1. Accreditation process 2. Benefit package 3. Costing mechanisms 4. Contracting process 5. Trends in claim process 6. Quality Assurance County Commissioner 1. Importance of having an health insurance cover 2. The benefit package 3. Rationale, objectives and structure of NHIF 4. Registration process 5. Cost of membership 6. Access points NHIF staff 1. Benefits package 2. Enrollment processes 3. Payment modes 4. Contracting and accreditation processes of HCPs 5. Access points 6. Trends in claims process 7. Quality Assurance 8. Dealing with defaulters Opinion leaders 1. The benefits package 2. Enrollment processes 3. Payment modes 4. The cost 5. Access points (both NHIF service outlets and accredited facilities) objectives and structure of NHIF 5.Communication Activities The strategy will focus on the following activities and use the outlined tactics to reach the audience. The Regional Offices and Branch structure will be very instrumental in implementing most of the activities. TA Members NHIF staff HCP Communication activity / Tactics Timeline Primary TA Development of IEC June 2017– and promotional July 2018 materials i.e. illustrated posters, pamphlets, brochures, fliers, handbooks, jingles, spot ads, billboards, flip charts Interpersonal June 2017– Communication by use July 2018 of brand ambassadors and roadshows (Below the line (BTL) target gatherings i.e market days, church storms, door to door communication, community gatherings i.e chief’s baraza Use of above the line Nov 2017 – communication (ATL) March 2018 such as Community radio broadcasting, vernacular radio and TV stations, mainstream TV and Radio Use of social media June 2017 – (TTL) and mobile phones July 2018 Newsletter, intranet, e- June 2017– mails, E-bulletin, social July 2018 media, social network enterprise, meetings Engagement through June 2017– consultative meetings, July 2018 phone calls, letters, Website, paid advertising , IEC and promotional materials Planned workshops Sept. 2017 – April 2018 Secondary TA Responsibility Comm/PE officer Comm/PE officer Comm Officer Comm Officer Comm officer DDM&PE/Mana ger Comm & PE DDM&PE/Mana ger Comm & PE budget County Government / county Commissioner ’s structure Opinion leaders Development partners, National government Engagement through consultative meetings, phone calls, letters, Website, earned media i.e op-eds, features etc Organize and participate in events such as conferences, workshops Organize and participate in exhibitions and shows Partnership efforts Sept. 2017 – April 2018 DSPM Sept. 2017 – April 2018 DDM&PE June 2017 – July 2018 Sept. 2017 – July 2018 June 2017 _ July 2018 Sept 2017 Manager Comm & PE DDM &PE Sponsorship and donations IEC and promotional materials Engagement through Sept. 2017 consultative meetings, April 2018 phone calls, letters, Website Organize seminars, Sept. 2017 conferences, workshops April 2018 Organize exhibitions June 2017 and shows to attract July 2018 members IEC and promotional June 2017 materials July 2018 Tertiary TA Policy briefs for June 2017 parliament, July 2018 development partners and ministry Organize consultative June 2017 meetings, seminars, and July 2018 workshops with key stakeholders Pursue partnership for June 2017 capacity building July 2018 DSPM Comm Officer – DSPM – DDM &PE – Manager Comm & PE – Comm Officer – DSPM – DSPM – DSPM 6. Monitoring and Evaluation system The strategy will have a monitoring and evaluation system where every stakeholder’s outcomes and outputs will be easily measured. members/be neficiaries Media Development partners HCPs Feedback & Feedforward system Natonal Government Staff Members Opinion Leaders county government County administrat on APPENDIX 1: COMMUNICATION PLAN NHIF Corporate Philosophy Vision To be a world class social health insurer Mission To provide accessible, affordable, sustainable, equitable and quality healthcare through optimal resources utilization to the satisfaction of stakeholders Core Values • Honesty • Accountability. • Integrity, Communication Objectives: Compared to previous FY’s, NHIF needs to put in considerably more effort in achieving tangible results and measurable changes. The Communication strategy plays an important role in obtaining these results, beside more traditional communications objectives. Thus, the following aim and objectives have been identified for NHIF for the FY 2017/18: 1 Achieving and sustaining results - To raise awareness about the added value of NHIF membership to achieve the specific results sought 2 Good governance - To support efficient and effective - management efforts and publicize in media To engage stakeholdersin order to build trust relationships with stakeholders 3 Intergrated approach Communication of NHIF brand and products and services through an intergrated approach to meet the target market effectively 1 INTERNAL COMMUNICATION – NHIF Staff 2 EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION – NHIF members, health care facilities, suppliers, government agencies, employers, COTU, etc 1.0 Internal communication Internal Communication has the potential to boost employee productivity, improve employee satisfaction, create a sense of community and solidify employee loyalty and trust. In addition to these benefits, an internal communications strategy can also be valuable in the following ways: Advantages of internal communication a Communicate the strategic direction of NHIF b Increase employee engagement c Building a sense of community among NHIF staff Disadvantages of internal communication Lack of a formal strategy can make for inefficient processing and distributing of information, which is essential for the growth and success of NHIF. It can lead to workplace misunderstandings and lowered employee engagement. Communication is essential for productivity and efficiency as well. When there is no internal communications strategy in place, things can start to quickly unravel: employees may withdraw and isolate themselves without the appropriate open dialogue. This has a spiral effect as it will make employees less accessible to other members of the team and can inadvertently cause rifts between departments, management levels, geographical locations and individuals. 1.1 Background of the NHIF Internal Communications Strategy Internal Communication is nested in NHIF’s Corporate Strategic Plan 2014/2018. IC is shelled in the People Perspective “Creating a staff establishment that is professional, ethical, courteous, accessible and willing to proactively solve customers’ problems”. This perspective aims at raising employee satisfaction to 80% through improving internal communicat...
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