Paper 1 - Jennifer Ewers Seat 72 Outside Influences on...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jennifer Ewers Seat 72 Outside Influences on American Colonization Throughout history events have happened in a cause and effect series where one occurrence comes to pass as a result of another incident. Thomas Bender’s main argument in Nation Among Nations is that “American history cannot be adequately understood unless it is incorporated into [a] global context” (Bender, 6). John Thornton’s Africa and Africans in the making of the Atlantic World and Karren Kupperman’s England’s Dream of Caribbean Empire help illustrate Bender’s argument by revealing global connections such as commerce and cultural exchange between the Americas, Europe, Africa and the West Indies. Although one can examine the slave trade within Africa because “slavery was widespread and indigenous in African society,” (John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World , 73) the African slave trade was connected to both Europe and the Americas. Europeans adopted the idea of slavery from Africa and practiced it in their own land; eventually, “the slave trade [became] an important branch of Afro-European commerce” (Thornton, 72).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course ENGL 104 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

Page1 / 3

Paper 1 - Jennifer Ewers Seat 72 Outside Influences on...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online