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WebCT+Ruby+Payne++Lecture+1+(ch[1].+1-3)

WebCT+Ruby+Payne++Lecture+1+(ch[1].+1-3) - Ruby Payne...

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Ruby Payne Lecture # 1 Chapter # 1 - 3 A Framework for Understanding Poverty
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Some Key Points To Remember Poverty is relative. Poverty occurs in all races and all countries. Economic class is a continuous line, not a clear-cut distinction… individuals can move along the continuum. Generational and situational poverty are not synonymous. There are patterns in poverty and all patterns have exceptions. Individuals bring the hidden rules of class in which they were raised to the school setting. Schools and businesses operate from the middle class perspective and these rules are not specifically taught. It is necessary for teachers to understand hidden rules and to teach the rules that will help students become successful in school and the work force. Teachers must provide support and expectations. To move from one class to another requires that individuals give up relationships for achievement.
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Statistics About Poverty (Payne 4 th ed.) In 2003, 7.6 million families in poverty (10%) Texas leads the nation in poverty. Poverty is caused by interrelated factors; parental employment status and earnings, education, and family structure. More single parent families; earned wage for women is 30-50% lower than men with same education level 17.6% poverty rate for children under age of 18; 20.3% under age of 6. Poor children more likely to suffer developmental delays, drop out of school, or become pregnant as teenagers. More likely to be victims of abuse or neglect.
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Children in Poverty in the U.S.
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Poverty – the extent to which an individual does without resources Page 7 Financial – having money to purchase service and goods. Emotional – Being able to choose and control emotional responses. Mental – Having the mental abilities to deal with daily life. Spiritual – Believing in a divine purpose and guidance.
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Poverty – the extent to which an individual does without resources Physical – Having physical strength and mobility. Support Systems – Having family, friends, and backup resources available in times of need. Relationships/Role Models – Having access to adults who are appropriate or nurturing to a child. Knowledge of the Hidden Rules – Knowing the unspoken cues and habits of a group.
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Registers of Language Frozen – Language that is always the same. Formal – The standard sentence syntax and word choice of work and school. Consultative – Formal register used in conversation. Casual – Language between friends, characterized by 400 – 800 word vocabulary. Intimate – Language between lovers or twins.
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How Does This Language Register Impact Students from Poverty? Poor students do not have access to the formal register at home.
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