WebCT+Ruby+Payne+Lecture+2+(ch[1].+4-6)

WebCT+Ruby+Payne+Lecture+2+(ch[1].+4-6) - Ruby Payne...

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Ruby Payne Lecture 2 Chapter 4 - 6
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Definitions of Poverty Generational Poverty is defined as having lived in poverty for two or more generations. However, the characteristics begin to surface much sooner than two generations if the family lives with others who are from generational poverty. Situational Poverty is defined as a lack of resources due to a particular event such as a death, chronic illness, divorce, loss of job etc. This is not a permanent situation.
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Generational Generational Poverty Generational poverty has its own culture, hidden rules, and belief systems. One of the key indicators of whether it is generational poverty is the prevailing attitude that society owes one a living. Situational Poverty In situational poverty, the attitude is often one of pride and a refusal to accept charity. Individuals in situational poverty often bring more resources with them than do those of generational poverty. Of particular importance is the use of formal language.
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Characteristics of Generational Poverty Pages 51-53 1. Background “Noise” : The TV is almost always on, no matter what the circumstance. Conversation is participatory, often with more than one person talking at the same time. 2. Importance of Personality: Individual personality is what one brings to the environment – because there is no money. The ability to entertain, tell stories, and have a sense of humor is highly valued. 3. Significance of Entertainment : When one can merely survive, then respite from the survival is important. In fact, entertainment brings respite. 4. Importance of Relationships: One only has people upon which to rely, and those relationships are important to survival. There are often favorites. 5. Matriarchal Structure: The mother has the most important position in the society if she functions as the caregiver. 6. Oral Language Tradition: The casual register is used for everything.
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Generational Poverty Pages 51-53 7. Survival Orientations: Discussion of academic topics is generally not prized. There is little room for the abstract. Discussions center around people and relationships. A job is only about making money to survive. A job is not about a career (e.g. “I was looking a job when I found this one”.) 8. Identity Tied to Lover/Fighter Role for Men: The key for a male is to be a “man”. The rules are rigid and the man is expected to work hard physically, and to be a lover and a fighter. 9. Identity Tied to the Rescuer/Martyr Role for Women: A “good” woman is expected to take care of and rescue her man and children as needed. 10. Importance of Non-Verbal/Kinesthetic Communications: Touch is used to communicate, as are space and non-verbal emotional information. 11. Ownership of People:
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course TEFB 273 taught by Professor Koebernick during the Spring '07 term at Texas A&M.

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WebCT+Ruby+Payne+Lecture+2+(ch[1].+4-6) - Ruby Payne...

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