A Textual Analysis of William Wordsworth�s �Tintern Abbey�

A Textual Analysis of William Wordsworth�s �Tintern Abbey�

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English 203 – 505 Min October 15, 2007 A Textual Analysis of William Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey” In William Wordsworth’s poem “Tintern Abbey” the reader is introduced to a narrator who is enamored with past experiences of this beautiful place, Tintern Abbey. Wordsworth’s use of visual imagery and symbolism help construct a stunning display of nature for the reader. One section of this poem, lines 93 - 111, goes into great detail to describe exactly what the speaker loves about nature and how it has helped guard the heart and soul of his "moral being." It is at this point that Wordsworth reveals to the reader that nature and a heavenly spirit are one. Wordsworth intent is for the reader to picture the narrator’s surroundings. He wants the reader to personally relate with what the speaker sees by using nature. Wordsworth relies heavily on the visual aspect of the experience, leaving out the other four senses. The use of color helps emphasis Wordsworth’s visual imagery. Using
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course ENGL 203 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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A Textual Analysis of William Wordsworth�s �Tintern Abbey�

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