Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: the second wave, unionism struggles...

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Chapter 3: the second wave, unionism struggles but takes root Setting: civil war did more than resolve the slavery issue it accentuated industrialization Breakpoint between agricultural America and industrial America Transcontinential railroad was authorized Homestead act National bank act Federal reserve system Between 1861 1890 labor force doubled in size labor force grew and so did mass immigration in 1870 in the industrial growing environment large enterprises had advantage over small enterprises manufacturing increased and produced a substantial surplus especially of wheat (feeding America) 3 states still excluded from the union but only for political reasons Immigration: 10.3 million immigrants entered the United States 14.8% forein born in the population Act to Encoursage Immigration -> wanted immigrants who would immediately become urban workers Competition for available jobs became acute as the opening of the transcontinental rail connection enabled thousands of workers in the East to move to California
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course D SOC 275 taught by Professor Gurak,d. during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: the second wave, unionism struggles...

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