REL 420 test 2 helpful terms

REL 420 test 2 helpful terms - Apologia The definition of...

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Apologia: The definition of apologia is a defense, especially of one's opinions, position, or actions. In the New Testament and other early writings, the genre of literature called apology consisted of the author mounting either a self-defense or a defense of a social group in he face of accusations. When Christianity came to be persecuted as a religion, its more literate members had to show why this mistreatment was altogether unjustified and to explain that the Christian faith was intellectually defensible and socially and politically innocuous. Some scholars believe that Luke and Acts are apologetic literature and that the books were written by a highly educated Christian who wanted to show that the life of Jesus was exemplary, as was the Christian church that emerged in his wake, and that both Jesus and his followers were deserving of better treatment from the hands of the government. In this gospel, Pontius Pilate declares on three different occasions that he finds no guilt in Jesus and after Jesus dies the centurion responsible for his execution also proclaims that he was innocent. This could be a defense of Christianity in the face of official opposition of the state. However, if Luke’s purpose was to curry the favor of Roman officials, it is odd that he did not portray them in a more favorable light. It is much more likely that these books were created by Christians for Christians. Beloved Disciple: Nickname for the “disciple whom Jesus loved” in the Gospel of John, who plays a prominent role in the Passion narrative but is never named. Older tradition identified him as John the son of Zebedee and claimed that it was he who wrote the Gospel. Gunther Bornkamm: He was a proponent of the Second Quest for the Historical Jesus ( Albert Schweitzer ) and suggested a tighter relationship between Jesus and the theology of the early church (in contrast to the 'First' and 'No Quest' periods ending in 1953).Numbered among his opponents, Rudolf Bultmann argued for a divorce between the two, but their approaches remain similar in many aspects. Docetism: The view that Jesus was not a human being but only appeared to be, from a Greek word meaning “to seem” or “to appear.” Four-Source Hypothesis: A solution to the “Synoptic Problem” which maintains that there are four sources that lie behind the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke: 1. Mark was the source for much of the narrative of Matthew and Luke; 2. Q was the source for the sayings found in Matthew and Luke but not in Mark; 3. M provided the material found only in Mathew’s Gospel; and 4. L provided the material found only in Luke. “Markan Priority” is the argument used to provide evidence in support of Matthew and Luke using Mark as a source. For example: 1. sometimes all three Gospels differ. This would happen whenever the two authors who borrowed the story each changed it in different ways. Finally, sometimes two of the three are exactly alike but the third differs. This would occur when both of the later authors borrowed the story but only one of them
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REL 420 test 2 helpful terms - Apologia The definition of...

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