Case Study- John Lewis Partnership.docx - Running Head CASE...

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Running Head: CASE STUDY: JOHN LEWIS PARTNERSHIP 1 Case Study: John Lewis Partnership Student’s name Course name and number Instructor’s name Submission Date
CASE STUDY: JOHN LEWIS PARTNERSHIP2 I. Major Facts John Lewis Partnership is unique among vast organizations in the UK in that, it is run for its employees’ advantage, as the greater part of its profits are divided among them (Baker, 2007). Due to the independence, this affords, John Lewis Partnership is perhaps less eager for publicity contrasted with most companies of its stature. John Lewis Partnership has two main arms, of almost equal size in turnover. The initial business was department stores, of which it has twenty- eight. The other arm is supermarkets, of which it has two hundred and thirty-four, all trading at Waitrose (Baker, 2007). The outlets can spawn total sales of £7.4 Billion (Baker, 2007); this is a marker of the efficiency and size of each. John Lewis Partnership’s development called for further warehousing capacity, and it was agreed that the ideal approach to supplement the current distribution channel was to institute an innovative Semi-Automated National Distribution Center (SANDC) to oversee small-sized items, applying the most recent technology in aims of enhancing precision and proficiency (Baker, 2007). II. Major Problems One problem John Lewis faces crops up because of its decision to trim operating costs in its department stores and offer ‘basics’ line into its Waitrose business wing. Buyers stay loyal to

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