SYLLABUS_INTRO_SOC_ZFALL_2007_WORD

SYLLABUS_INTRO_SOC_ZFALL_2007_WORD - 1 Sociology 101 Fall,...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Sociology 101 Fall, 2007 MWF 1:25-2:15 Office Hours: M 2:30-3:30 Course Description: Introduction to Sociology Paul McLaughlin Uris Hall 326 Phone: 255-8868 pjm36@cornell.edu This course will provide you with a general introduction to the field of sociology. I have designed the lectures, readings and assignments to acquaint you with the basic concepts and some of the major perspectives in the field. The course is divided into 9 sections: (1) the historical and philosophical roots of "modern" sociology, (2) the ideology of progress in colonial Africa, (3) the Marxian tradition and the student movement against sweatshops, (4) the Durkheimian tradition and the "Savage Inequalities" of American education, (5) the Weberian tradition and al Qaeda, (6) the sociology of everyday life, (7) contemporary feminist theories, (8) postmodernism and science fiction and (9) evolutionary theory and the U.S. environmental movement. We will begin each section by considering one or more of the major classical or contemporary theoretical perspectives in sociology. We will then apply the concepts derived from those perspectives to help us make sense of various historical or contemporary social issues. The overall goal of the course will be to give students a deeper appreciation of the dialogue between theory and evidence that is at the heart of the sociological enterprise. Required Texts: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics. New York: McGraw Hill. James Henslin. 2005. Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings. 13th Edition. New York: Free Press. Adam Hochschild. 1998. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. John Perkins. 2004. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. New York: Penguin Group. Liza Featherstone. 2002. Students Against Sweatshops. New York: Verso. Jonathan Kozol. 1991. Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools. NY: Crown Publishers, Inc. Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama bin Laden. New York: Simon and Schuster. Note: Articles appearing in the syllabus in italics are in the Sociology 101 Course Packet which can be obtained along with the other texts at the bookstore. Course Requirements and Evaluation: Class-time will be a combination of lecture and discussion. In order to receive the full benefit of these sessions, students should complete readings listed for each day in advance. Grading will be done on the following basis: Points Exam 1 Exam 2 Exam 3 Total 30 points 35 points 35 points 100 points Translation to Letter Grade A+ = 96.66-100 A = 93.33-96.65 A- = 90.00-93.32 B+ = 86.66-89.99 B BC+ C = 83.33-86.65 = 80.00-83.32 = 76.66-79.99 = 73.33-76.65 CD+ D D= 70.00-73.32 = 66.66-69.99 = 63.33-66.65 = 60.00-63.32 F = <60.00 The three in-class exams will constitute 100% of your grade. In-class exams will consist of some combination of true/false, multiple choice, textual interpretation and 1 essay question. Two or three potential essay questions will be announced in advance to facilitate your preparation for the exam. The essay question which appears on the exam will be chosen at random. I will also post on blackboard a list of definitions of key concepts that may appear on the exam. However, please note that there will generally be a number of questions on the exam which are related to material covered in the lecture but which may not appear on the concept sheets and/or readings. So you should assume that it is necessary to attend class regularly to do well in the course. The exams will not be cumulative each exam will cover only the material specified in the syllabus. Please note, if you miss one of the exams for any reason, you will be required to write a 6 page paper as a make-up. Also note that the final will be given only once, on the date scheduled by the registrar. There will be no alternate dates or exceptions unless you have a documented illness or family emergency in which case you will receive an incomplete and be asked to write a 6 page paper. Please make your travel and other plans accordingly. Please also note that the cutoffs for letter grades given above are absolute. Also, with the exception of mathematical errors, all grades are final and non-negotiable under any circumstances. Extra Credit Points: In addition to the exams, there will be 3 short unannounced quizzes over the course of the term. These quizzes will test your knowledge of the readings for that day. They will count for 2.5 points each. Only your two highest quiz scores will count and they will be added to the total of your 3 exams. Essentially the quizzes allow you to earn extra credit points. The intent is to reward those who consistently do the readings and show up for class. I realize that missing class is sometimes unavoidable. That is why I am dropping your lowest quiz grade. But please note, if you miss a second or third quiz FOR ANY REASON there is no make-up. Students will also have the opportunity to earn an additional 1 point of extra credit for participating in a research project sponsored by the sociology department. Please note that ALL questions regarding participation in and the posting of the 1 point of extra credit for this research project should be directed to Steve Benard at swb24@cornell.edu. Your final grade for the course will be the total of your 3 exams plus all extra credit points out of 100 points. Attendance: Attendance is mandatory. Students are responsible for all material covered in the lectures and any assigned readings. Blackboard: Various types of course information course announcements, the syllabus, grades, PowerPoint slides, external links, etc. will be posted on the course website at http://www.blackboard.cornell.edu/. You should check this site on a regular basis. All students must enroll in the website during the first week of class. Instructions for enrolling in blackboard can be found at: http://www.cit.cornell.edu/atc/cst/howto_selfenroll.shtml. If you are enrolling in blackboard for the first time please capitalize the first letter of your first and last name only e.g., Paul McLaughlin. If you enter your name in any other way it will affect how blackboard alphabetizes certain functions. I will do my best to post the PowerPoint slides in advance of each class. For those who find it helpful, PowerPoint has an option on the print menu that allows you to print 3 slides on the lefthand side of the page with blank lines to take notes on the right-hand side (under "print what" select "handouts" and under "slides per page" select "3"). Course Outline Part I: The Historical and Philosophical Roots of "Modern" Sociology Discussion 1: Friday, August 24: Why do Sociology Assignment: Movie (clip): The Matrix Peter Berger. 2007. Invitation to Sociology. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 3-7 C. Wright Mills. 2007. The Promise. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 20-27 Discussion 2: Monday, August 27: How to do Sociology Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 1-11 James M. Henslin. 2007. How Sociologists do Research. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 35-47 Bruce A. Jacobs. 2007. Doing Research with Streetcorner Crack Dealers. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 73-81 Discussion 3: Wednesday, August 29: Essentialism, Hierarchy, Progress and Moral Certainty in Western Thought Assignment: Gilbert Rist. 2002. The History of Development: From Western Origins to Global Faith pp. 25-46 Part II: The Ideology of Progress in Colonial Africa Discussion 4: Friday, August 31: "Suddenly they saw a big boat rising out of the great ocean. This boat had wings all of white, sparkling life knives." Mukunzo Kioko Assignment: Adam Hochschild. 1998. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa pp. 1-74 Discussion 5: Monday, September 3: "To open to civilization the only part of our globe which it has not yet penetrated, to pierce the darkness which hangs over entire peoples, is, I dare say, a crusade worthy of this century of progress...." King Leopold II of Belgium Assignment: Adam Hochschild. 1998. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa pp. 75-149 Discussion 6: Wednesday, September 5: "Each time the corporal goes out to get rubber, cartridges are given to him. He must bring back all not used; and for every one used he must bring back a right hand!" Simon Roi Assignment: Adam Hochschild. 1998. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa pp. 150-224 Discussion 7: Friday, September 7: "The voices which, in default of the destroyed archives, might speak in their stead have systematically been condemned to silence for considerations of a higher order." Colonel Maximilien Strauch Assignment: Adam Hochschild. 1998. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa pp. 225-306 Part III: The Marxian Tradition and the Student Movement Against Sweatshops Discussion 8: Monday, September 10: "The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggle." Karl Marx Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 19-27 John Perkins. 2004. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man pp. xix-xxv, 3-27 Discussion 9: Wednesday, September 12: "The cheap prices of its commodities are the heavy artillery with which it batters down all Chinese walls...." Karl Marx Assignment: Movie: The New Rulers of the World. ILR Library HG3881.5.W57 N49 2001(53 minutes) John Perkins. 2004. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man pp. 28-58 Discussion 10: Friday, September 14: Life on the Receiving End of Globalization Assignment: Liza Featherstone. 2002. Students Against Sweatshops pp. 1-39 John Perkins. 2007. The Secret History of the American Empire. pp. 35-49 Discussion 11: Monday, September 17: Relearning Democratic Pluralism the Hard Way Assignment: Liza Featherstone. 2002. Students Against Sweatshops pp. 40-79 Discussion 12: Wednesday, September 19: "I Must Create a System or Be Enslav'd by Another Man's" William Blake Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 51-55, 103-116 Liza Featherstone. 2002. Students Against Sweatshops pp. 80-105 Discussion 13: Friday, September 21: "You have a problem, Mr. Anderson. You think that you're special. You believe that somehow the rules do not apply to you." Rhineheart (i.e., be on time for the exam!) S n n In-Class Exam I on Parts I to III n Part IV: The Durkheimian Tradition and the "Savage Inequalities" of American Education Discussion 14: Monday, September 24: Solidarity and the Division of Labor Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 13-19 Emile Durkheim. 1984. The Division of Labor in Society pp. 310-322 Discussion 15: Wednesday, September 26: The Third World in America's Heartland Assignment: Movie: Children in America's Schools (58 minutes) Jonathon Kozol. 1991. Savage Inequalities. pp. 1-39 Discussion 16: Friday, September 28: The Not so Level Playing Field in the Empire State Assignment: Jonathon Kozol. 1991. Savage Inequalities. pp. 83-132 Discussion 17: Monday, October 1: Social Stratification: Functional Necessity or System of Domination? Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 64-68, 80-85 Herbert J. Gans. 2007. The Uses of Poverty: The Poor Pay All. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 376-382 Part V: The Weberian Tradition and al Qaeda Discussion 18: Wednesday, October 3: Remember that time is money" Benjamin Franklin Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 27-42, 263-266 George Bush. 2002. Introduction: The National Security Strategy of the United States of America. Online at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc/nss.html (read Introduction, browse other sections) Discussion 19: Friday, October 5: A Declaration of War Against America Assignment: Movie: Frontline: In Search of bin Laden. Olin Library Video Center HV6430 .I5 2001 (60 minutes) Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 1-43 John Perkins. 2004. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man pp. 87-113 (Recommended) Discussion 20: Wednesday, October 10: Competing and Irreconcilable Value Systems Assignment: Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 44-78 Discussion 21: Friday, October12: Charismatic Authority and the Origins of the Taliban Assignment: Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 79-129 Discussion 22: Monday, October 15: Charismatic Authority and the Origins of al-Qaeda Assignment: Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 130-170 Discussion 23: Wednesday, October 17: Political Opportunities, Framing, Resource Mobilization and al-Qaeda Assignment: Sidney Tarrow. 1998. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics pp. 10-25 Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 171-198 Discussion 24: Friday, October 19: "The people of Islam awakened and realized that they are the main target for the aggression of the Zionist-Crusaders' alliance." OBL Assignment: Peter L. Bergen. 2002. Holy War Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden pp. 199-245 Part VI: The Sociology of Everyday Life Discussion 25: Monday, October 22: Mind, Self and Society Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 55-63 Harry L. Gracey. 2007. Kindergarten as Academic Boot Camp. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 446-460 Discussion 26: Wednesday, October 24: Symbolic Interaction and the Social Construction of Reality Assignment: James M. Henslin. 2007. Eating Your Friends is the Hardest: The Survivors of the F-227. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 277-286 William J. Chambliss. 2007. The Saints and the Roughnecks. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 299-314 Philip G. Zimbardo. 2007. The Pathology of Imprisonment. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 315-321 Discussion 27: Friday, October 26: The Dramaturgy of Resistance in a Malaysian Village Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 132-144 Erving Goffman. 2007. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 135-146 James C. Scott. 1985. Small Arms Fire in the Class War. In Weapons of the Weak pp. 1-27 Discussion 28: Monday, October 29: Small Arms Fire in the Gender War Assignment: Laura L. Miller. 2007. Women in the Military. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 518-534 Discussion 29: Wednesday, October 31: "What have you learned Dorothy?" (emoh ekil ecalp on si ereht) Assignment: S n n In-Class Exam 2 on Parts IV to VI n Part VII: Contemporary Feminist Theories Discussion 30: Friday, November 2: Gender Difference Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 185-191 James M. Henslin. 2007. On Becoming Male: Reflections of a Sociologist on Childhood and Early Socialization. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 161-172 Donna Eder. 2007. On Becoming Female: Lessons Learned in School. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 173-179 Barrie Thorne and Zella Luria. 2007. Sexuality and Gender in Children's Daily Worlds. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 180-191 Discussion 31: Monday, November 5: Gender Inequality Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 191-195 Barbara Ehrenreich. 2007. Nickel and Dimed. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 393-406 Arlie Russell Hochschild. 2005. When Work Becomes Home and Home Becomes Work. pp. 407-417 POSTED ON BLACKBOARD Discussion 32: Wednesday, November 7: Gender Oppression Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 195-200 Diana Scully and Joseph Marolla. 2007. "Riding the Bull at Gilley's": Convicted Rapists Describe the Rewards of Rape. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 48-62 Evelyn Fox Keller. 1985. A World of Difference. In Reflections on Gender and Science pp. 158-176 Discussion 33: Friday, November 9: Structural Oppression Assignment: George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 200-214 Manjari Mehta. 1996. "Our Lives Are No Different From That of Our Buffaloes": Agricultural Change and Gendered Spaces in a Central Himalayan Valley. In Feminist Political Ecology: Global Issues and Local Experiences, edited by Dianne Rocheleau, Barbara Thomas-Slayter and Esther Wangari pp. 180-208 Part VIII: Postmodernism and Science Fiction Discussion 34: Monday, November 12: The Exhaustion of Grand Narratives Assignment: Movie: 12 Monkeys (130 minutes) (NOTE: ON THIS DAY CLASS WILL HELD FROM 7:30-9:45 P.M.) George Ritzer. 2007. Contemporary Sociological Theory and Its Classical Roots: The Basics pp. 215-250 Christian Parenti. 2001. Big Brother's Corporate Cousin. The Nation 273(5):26-30 Discussion 35: Wednesday, November 14: "Seriously, more and more people are being defined now as mentally ill. Why? Because they're not consuming on their own. But as patients, they become consumers of mental health care. And this gives the so-called sane people work!" Jeffrey Assignment: David L. Rosenhan. 2007. On Being Sane in Insane Places. In Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, edited by James M. Henslin pp. 322-334 Discussion 36: Friday, November 16: "One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them, one ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them." J.R.R. Tolkien Assignment: Bill Joy. 2000. Why the Future Doesn't Need Us. Wired (April) pp. 238-262 available at: http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.04/joy_pr.html Part IX: Evolutionary Theory and the U.S. Environmental Movement Discussion 37: Monday, November 19: "...almost every mistake and folly which was perpetuated in the creation of a satisfactory theory of organic evolution was duplicated or had its analogue in the social field." Loren Eiseley Assignment: Ernst Mayr. [1971]1976. The Nature of the Darwinian Revolution. In Evolution and the Diversity of Life pp. 277-296 Discussion 38: Monday, November 26: Toward a Darwinian Theory of Social Change Assignment: Michael T. Hannan and Glenn R. Carroll. 1995. An Introduction to Organizational Ecology. In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure, Selection pp. 17-31 Michael T. Hannan. 1995. Labor Unions. In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure, Selection, edited by Glenn Carroll and Michael T. Hannan pp. 121-136 Discussion 39: Wednesday, November 28: Manifest Destiny and the Origins of the U.S. Environmental Movement Assignment: Genesis. 1.1-3.24 (bring a copy to class) Lynn White, Jr. 1967. The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crises. Science 155:1203-1207 Discussion 40: Friday, November 30: The Growth and Diversification of the Environmental Movement Assignment: Riley E. Dunlap and Angela G. Mertig. 1992. American Environmentalism pp. 1-10 t n n Exam 3 on Parts VII to IX n On Date of the Scheduled Final When the Matrix was first built there was a man born inside that had the ability to change what he wanted, to remake the Matrix as he saw fit. It was this man that freed the first of us and taught us the secret of the war; control the Matrix and you control the future. Morpheus ...
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