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Unformatted text preview: Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide For Use with Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 Red Hat Customer Content Services Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide For Use with Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 Legal Notice Copyright © 2016 Red Hat, Inc. The text of and illustrations in this document are licensed by Red Hat under a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license ("CC-BY-SA"). An explanation of CC-BY-SA is available at . In accordance with CC-BY-SA, if you distribute this document or an adaptation of it, you must provide the URL for the original version. Red Hat, as the licensor of this document, waives the right to enforce, and agrees not to assert, Section 4d of CC-BY-SA to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. Red Hat, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the Shadowman logo, JBoss, MetaMatrix, Fedora, the Infinity Logo, and RHCE are trademarks of Red Hat, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. Linux ® is the registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States and other countries. Java ® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. XFS ® is a trademark of Silicon Graphics International Corp. or its subsidiaries in the United States and/or other countries. MySQL ® is a registered trademark of MySQL AB in the United States, the European Union and other countries. Node.js ® is an official trademark of Joyent. Red Hat Software Collections is not formally related to or endorsed by the official Joyent Node.js open source or commercial project. The OpenStack ® Word Mark and OpenStack Logo are either registered trademarks/service marks or trademarks/service marks of the OpenStack Foundation, in the United States and other countries and are used with the OpenStack Foundation's permission. We are not affiliated with, endorsed or sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation, or the OpenStack community. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Abstract This document provides a practical guide for administrators to configure Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7. Table of Contents Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . .1.. .OVERVIEW CHAPTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .2.. .STARTING . . . . . . . . . AND . . . . .STOPPING . . . . . . . . . .JBOSS . . . . . . EAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . 2.1. STARTING JBOSS EAP 7 2.2. STOPPING JBOSS EAP 8 2.3. RUNNING JBOSS EAP IN ADMIN-ONLY MODE 8 2.4. SUSPEND AND SHUT DOWN JBOSS EAP GRACEFULLY 10 2.5. STARTING AND STOPPING JBOSS EAP (RPM INSTALLATION) 12 2.6. POWERSHELL SCRIPTS 14 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .3.. .JBOSS . . . . . . EAP . . . . .MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 ........... Using the Management Console or the Management CLI 16 3.1. MANAGEMENT USERS 16 3.2. MANAGEMENT INTERFACES 18 3.3. CONFIGURATION DATA 22 3.4. FILE SYSTEM PATHS 28 3.5. MANAGEMENT AUDIT LOGGING 33 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .4.. .NETWORK . . . . . . . . . .AND . . . .PORT . . . . . CONFIGURATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 ........... 4.1. INTERFACES 38 4.2. SOCKET BINDINGS 4.3. IPV6 ADDRESSES 40 43 . . . . . . . . . .5.. .JBOSS CHAPTER . . . . . . EAP . . . . .SECURITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 ........... . . . . . . . . . .6.. .JBOSS CHAPTER . . . . . . EAP . . . . .CLASS . . . . . . LOADING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 ........... 6.1. MODULES 6.2. MODULE DEPENDENCIES 46 47 6.3. CREATE A CUSTOM MODULE 6.4. DEFINE GLOBAL MODULES 6.5. CONFIGURE SUBDEPLOYMENT ISOLATION 48 49 50 6.6. DEFINE AN EXTERNAL JBOSS EAP MODULE DIRECTORY 6.7. DYNAMIC MODULE NAMING CONVENTIONS 50 51 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .7.. .DEPLOYING . . . . . . . . . . .APPLICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 ........... 7.1. DEPLOYING APPLICATIONS USING THE MANAGEMENT CLI 52 7.2. DEPLOYING APPLICATIONS USING THE MANAGEMENT CONSOLE 54 7.3. DEPLOYING APPLICATIONS USING THE DEPLOYMENT SCANNER 56 7.4. DEPLOYING APPLICATIONS USING MAVEN 7.5. DEPLOYING APPLICATIONS USING THE HTTP API 7.6. CUSTOMIZING DEPLOYMENT BEHAVIOR 59 60 61 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .8.. .DOMAIN . . . . . . . .MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 ........... 8.1. ABOUT MANAGED DOMAINS 67 8.2. NAVIGATING DOMAIN CONFIGURATIONS 8.3. LAUNCHING A MANAGED DOMAIN 8.4. MANAGING SERVERS 8.5. MANAGED DOMAIN SETUPS 8.6. MANAGING JBOSS EAP PROFILES 69 71 75 79 81 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .9.. .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . JVM . . . . SETTINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 ........... 9.1. CONFIGURING JVM SETTINGS FOR A STANDALONE SERVER 83 9.2. CONFIGURING JVM SETTINGS FOR A MANAGED DOMAIN 83 9.3. DISPLAYING THE JVM STATUS IN THE MANAGEMENT CONSOLE 85 1 Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide 9.4. SPECIFYING 32 OR 64-BIT JVM ARCHITECTURE 85 . . . . . . . . . .10. CHAPTER . . .MAIL . . . . .SUBSYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 ........... 10.1. CONFIGURING THE MAIL SUBSYSTEM 10.2. CONFIGURING CUSTOM TRANSPORTS 88 88 . . . . . . . . . .11. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . WEB . . . . .SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 ........... .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .12. . . .LOGGING . . . . . . . . .WITH . . . . .JBOSS . . . . . . EAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 ........... 12.1. ABOUT SERVER LOGGING 92 12.2. ABOUT APPLICATION LOGGING 95 12.3. VIEWING LOG FILES 12.4. ABOUT THE LOGGING SUBSYSTEM 12.5. CONFIGURING LOG CATEGORIES 12.6. CONFIGURING LOG HANDLERS 97 99 107 108 12.7. CONFIGURING THE ROOT LOGGER 12.8. CONFIGURING LOG FORMATTERS 12.9. LOGGING PROFILES 127 128 130 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .13. . . .DATASOURCE . . . . . . . . . . . . .MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 ............ 13.1. ABOUT JBOSS EAP DATASOURCES 134 13.2. JDBC DRIVERS 13.3. CREATING DATASOURCES 134 140 13.4. MODIFYING DATASOURCES 143 13.5. REMOVING DATASOURCES 13.6. TESTING DATASOURCE CONNECTIONS 144 145 13.7. XA DATASOURCE RECOVERY 13.8. DATABASE CONNECTION VALIDATION 145 149 13.9. DATASOURCE SECURITY 151 13.10. DATASOURCE STATISTICS 13.11. CAPACITY POLICIES 152 154 13.12. ENLISTMENT TRACING 13.13. EXAMPLE DATASOURCE CONFIGURATIONS 157 157 . . . . . . . . . .14. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRANSACTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180 ............ 14.1. TRANSACTIONS SUBSYSTEM CONFIGURATION 180 14.2. TRANSACTION ADMINISTRATION 183 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .15. . . .ORB . . . . CONFIGURATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189 ............ 15.1. ABOUT COMMON OBJECT REQUEST BROKER ARCHITECTURE (CORBA) 189 15.2. CONFIGURE THE ORB FOR JTS TRANSACTIONS 189 . . . . . . . . . .16. CHAPTER . . .JAVA . . . . .CONNECTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . ARCHITECTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(JCA) . . . . . MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191 ............ 16.1. ABOUT THE JAVA CONNECTOR ARCHITECTURE (JCA) 16.2. ABOUT RESOURCE ADAPTERS 191 191 16.3. CONFIGURING THE JCA SUBSYSTEM 16.4. CONFIGURING RESOURCE ADAPTERS 191 195 16.5. CONFIGURE MANAGED CONNECTION POOLS 198 16.6. VIEW CONNECTION STATISTICS 198 .CHAPTER . . . . . . . . .17. . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE . . . . WEB . . . . .SERVER . . . . . . . .(UNDERTOW) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200 ............ 17.1. UNDERTOW SUBSYSTEM OVERVIEW 200 2 17.2. CONFIGURING BUFFER CACHES 201 17.3. CONFIGURING A SERVER 17.4. CONFIGURING A SERVLET CONTAINER 202 203 17.5. CONFIGURING HANDLERS 204 Table of Contents 17.5. CONFIGURING HANDLERS 17.6. CONFIGURING FILTERS 204 205 17.7. CONFIGURE THE DEFAULT WELCOME WEB APPLICATION 207 17.8. CONFIGURING HTTPS 17.9. CONFIGURING HTTP SESSION TIMEOUT 209 209 17.10. CONFIGURING HTTP-ONLY SESSION MANAGEMENT COOKIES 17.11. CONFIGURING HTTP/2 209 210 17.12. CONFIGURING A REQUESTDUMPING HANDLER 212 . . . . . . . . . .18. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . REMOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215 ............ 18.1. ABOUT THE REMOTING SUBSYSTEM 18.2. CONFIGURING THE ENDPOINT 215 217 18.3. CONFIGURING A CONNECTOR 218 18.4. CONFIGURING AN HTTP CONNECTOR 18.5. CONFIGURING AN OUTBOUND CONNECTION 218 219 18.6. CONFIGURING A REMOTE OUTBOUND CONNECTION 18.7. CONFIGURING A LOCAL OUTBOUND CONNECTION 219 220 . . . . . . . . . .19. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE . . . . IO . . .SUBSYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222 ............ 19.1. IO SUBSYSTEM OVERVIEW 222 19.2. CONFIGURING A WORKER 19.3. CONFIGURING A BUFFER POOL 222 222 . . . . . . . . . .20. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . BATCH . . . . . . .APPLICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224 ............ 20.1. CONFIGURING BATCH JOBS 20.2. MANAGING BATCH JOBS 224 227 . . . . . . . . . .21. CHAPTER . . .CONFIGURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . HIGH . . . . . AVAILABILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229 ............ 21.1. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH AVAILABILITY 229 21.2. CLUSTER COMMUNICATION WITH JGROUPS 21.3. INFINISPAN 230 234 21.4. CONFIGURING JBOSS EAP AS A FRONT-END LOAD BALANCER 246 21.5. USING AN EXTERNAL WEB SERVER AS A PROXY SERVER 21.6. THE MOD_CLUSTER HTTP CONNECTOR 249 252 21.7. APACHE MOD_JK HTTP CONNECTOR 21.8. APACHE MOD_PROXY HTTP CONNECTOR 263 267 21.9. MICROSOFT ISAPI CONNECTOR 269 21.10. ORACLE NSAPI CONNECTOR 276 . . . . . . . . . . A. APPENDIX . . .REFERENCE . . . . . . . . . . . MATERIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282 ............ A.1. SERVER RUNTIME ARGUMENTS A.2. RPM SERVICE CONFIGURATION FILES 282 285 A.3. RPM SERVICE CONFIGURATION PROPERTIES 286 A.4. ADD-USER UTILITY ARGUMENTS 287 A.5. MANAGEMENT AUDIT LOGGING ATTRIBUTES 289 A.6. INTERFACE ATTRIBUTES A.7. SOCKET BINDING ATTRIBUTES 292 294 A.8. DEFAULT SOCKET BINDINGS 294 A.9. DEPLOYMENT SCANNER MARKER FILES 296 A.10. DEPLOYMENT SCANNER ATTRIBUTES 297 A.11. ROOT LOGGER ATTRIBUTES A.12. LOG CATEGORY ATTRIBUTES 298 299 A.13. CONSOLE LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 300 A.14. FILE LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 301 A.15. PERIODIC LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 302 3 Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide 4 A.16. SIZE LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 303 A.17. PERIODIC SIZE ROTATING LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES A.18. SYSLOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 304 306 A.19. CUSTOM LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 307 A.20. ASYNC LOG HANDLER ATTRIBUTES 308 A.21. DATASOURCE CONNECTION URLS 308 A.22. DATASOURCE PARAMETERS A.23. DATASOURCE STATISTICS 309 318 A.24. TRANSACTION MANAGER CONFIGURATION OPTIONS 322 A.25. TRANSACTION MANAGER ADVANCED CONFIGURATION OPTIONS 323 A.26. RESOURCE ADAPTER ATTRIBUTES 325 A.27. RESOURCE ADAPTER STATISTICS A.28. UNDERTOW SUBSYSTEM ATTRIBUTES 331 332 A.29. DEFAULT BEHAVIOR OF HTTP METHODS 364 A.30. IO SUBSYSTEM ATTRIBUTES 365 A.31. REMOTING SUBSYSTEM ATTRIBUTES 366 A.32. APACHE HTTP SERVER MOD_CLUSTER DIRECTIVES A.33. MOD_CLUSTER SUBSYSTEM ATTRIBUTES 374 378 A.34. MOD_JK WORKER PROPERTIES 383 A.35. SECURITY MANAGER SUBSYSTEM ATTRIBUTES 385 Table of Contents 5 Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide CHAPTER 1. OVERVIEW The purpose of this guide is to cover many of the necessary configuration tasks needed for setting up and maintaining JBoss EAP as well as running applications and other services on JBoss EAP on it. Before using this guide to configure JBoss EAP, its assumed that the latest version of JBoss EAP has been downloaded and installed. For more details on the obtaining and installing JBoss EAP, please see the Getting Started Guide. Important Since the installation location of JBoss EAP will vary between host machines, this guide refers to the installation location JBoss EAP simply as EAP_HOME. The actual location of the JBoss EAP install should be used instead of EAP_HOME when performing administrative tasks. 6 CHAPTER 2. STARTING AND STOPPING JBOSS EAP CHAPTER 2. STARTING AND STOPPING JBOSS EAP 2.1. STARTING JBOSS EAP JBoss EAP runs in one of two operating modes: as a standalone server or in a managed domain, and is supported on several platforms: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Windows Server, Oracle Solaris, and Hewlett-Packard HP-UX. The specific command to start JBoss EAP depends on the underlying platform and the desired operating mode. Start JBoss EAP as a Standalone Server $ EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.sh Note For Windows Server, use the EAP_HOME\bin\standalone.bat script. This startup script uses the EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.conf file (or standalone.conf.bat for Windows Server) to set some default preferences, such as JVM options. You can customize the settings in this file. JBoss EAP uses the standalone.xml configuration file by default, but can be started using a different one. For details on the available standalone configuration files and how to use them, see the Standalone Server Configuration Files section. For a complete listing of all available startup script arguments and their purposes, use the --help argument or see the Server Runtime Arguments section. Start JBoss EAP in a Managed Domain The domain controller must be started before the servers in any of the server groups in the domain. Use this script to first start the domain controller, and then for each associated host controller. $ EAP_HOME/bin/domain.sh Note For Windows Server, use the EAP_HOME\bin\domain.bat script. This startup script uses the EAP_HOME/bin/domain.conf file (or domain.conf.bat for Windows Server) to set some default preferences, such as JVM options. You can customize the settings in this file. JBoss EAP uses the host.xml host configuration file by default, but can be started using a different one. For details on the available managed domain configuration files and how to use them, see the Managed Domain Configuration Files section. 7 Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide When setting up a managed domain, additional arguments will need to be passed into the startup script. For a complete listing of all available startup script arguments and their purposes, use the -help argument or see the Reference of Startup Arguments section. 2.2. STOPPING JBOSS EAP The way that you stop JBoss EAP depends on how it was started. Stop an Interactive Instance of JBoss EAP Press Ctrl+C in the terminal where JBoss EAP was started. Stop a Background Instance of JBoss EAP Use the management CLI to connect to the running instance and shut down the server. 1. Launch the management CLI. $ EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.sh --connect 2. Issue the shutdown command. shutdown Note When running in a managed domain, you must specify the host name to shut down by using the --host argument with the shutdown command. 2.3. RUNNING JBOSS EAP IN ADMIN-ONLY MODE JBoss EAP has the ability to be started in admin-only mode. This enables JBoss EAP to run and accept management requests but not start other runtime services or accept end user requests. Admin-only mode is available in both standalone servers as well as managed domains. In a managed domain, if a domain controller is started in admin-only mode, it will not accept incoming connections from slave host controllers. To start a JBoss EAP instance in admin-only mode, use the --admin-only runtime switch when starting the JBoss EAP instance. Note The management CLI commands shown assume that you are running a JBoss EAP standalone server. For more details on using the management CLI for a JBoss EAP managed domain, please see the JBoss EAP Management CLI Guide. Start JBoss EAP in Admin-Only Mode $ EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.sh --admin-only 8 CHAPTER 2. STARTING AND STOPPING JBOSS EAP Check If JBoss EAP is Running in Admin-Only Mode To determine if a JBoss EAP instance is running in admin-only mode: Note The management CLI commands shown assume that you are running a JBoss EAP standalone server. For more details on using the management CLI for a JBoss EAP managed domain, please see the JBoss EAP Management CLI Guide. :read-attribute(name=running-mode) If the JBoss EAP instance is running in admin-only mode, the result will be: { "outcome" => "success", "result" => "ADMIN_ONLY" } otherwise, the result will be: { "outcome" => "success", "result" => "NORMAL" } Restart in a Different Mode from the Management CLI In addition to stopping and starting a JBoss EAP instance with a different runtime switch, the management CLI may also be used to reload the server and start it in a different mode. To reload a JBoss EAP instance to start in admin-only mode: Note The management CLI commands shown assume that you are running a JBoss EAP standalone server. For more details on using the management CLI for a JBoss EAP managed domain, please see the JBoss EAP Management CLI Guide. :reload(admin-only=true) To reload a JBoss EAP instance to start in normal mode: :reload(admin-only=false) 9 Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.0 Configuration Guide Note Separate from the current running mode, the initial running mode may also be checked with the following command: /core-service=server-environment:readattribute(name=initial-running-mode). This command differs from :readattribute(name=running-mode) by displaying the running mode in which JBoss EAP was launched and NOT its current running mode. 2.4. SUSPEND AND SHUT DOWN JBOSS EAP GRACEFULLY JBoss EAP can be suspended or shut down gracefully. This allows active requests to complete normally, without accepting any new requests. A timeout value specifies how long that the suspend or shut down operation will wait for active requests to complete. While the server is suspended, management requests are still processed. Graceful shutdown is coordinated at a server-wide level, mostly focused on the entry points at which a request enters the server. The following subsystems support graceful shutdown: Undertow The Undertow subsystem will wait for all requests to finish. mod_cluster The mod_cluster subsystem will notify the load balancer that the serve...
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  • Spring '17
  • azmat fatma
  • Web server, Internet Information Services, Red Hat, jboss eap

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