Nor or Or.pdf - Aplia Student Question 1 of 7...

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3. Verbs: Agreement Verbs Use the following list of key terms to help you answer the questions that follow. Term Definition Collective Noun A group of people or things considered as a unit Conjunction A word that is used to link words, phrases, or clauses Parenthetic Words Words that provide an added or extra comment Plural Referring to more than one person, place, or thing Prepositional Phrases Groups of words containing a preposition followed by a noun, often indicating time or location Singular Referring to one person, place, or thing Subject A noun or pronoun that controls the verb in a sentence Subjunctive Mood A change in a verb that lets it express doubts, wishes, or hypothetical situations Verbs are words that refer to actions or states of being. Verbs must be in the appropriate tense and agree with the subject of the sentence. If the subject of a sentence is singular , the verb must also take a singular form. If the subject is plural , then the verb should also be plural. In most cases, determining whether to use the singular or plural form of the verb is fairly simple. However, it sometimes becomes tricky to identify whether a subject is singular or plural. In this tutorial, you will learn about verb agreement rules for a variety of subject patterns. You will also learn about when the subjunctive mood is used for hypothetical situations. Aplia: Student Question ... 1 of 7 9/13/2018, 4:06 PM
Points: 1 / 1 By understanding verb agreement and mood, you will be able to avoid written errors that undermine your professional credibility. Verb Agreement with Subjects with Intervening Phrases Verbs must always agree with the subject, even when there are intervening prepositional phrases or parenthetic words between the subject and the verb. When you encounter a sentence with an intervening phrase, find the actual subject by crossing out the intervening parenthetic or prepositional phrase. Common prepositions include about, at, by, for, from, of, and to . Subjects do not appear in prepositional phrases. See the following table for examples. Example Explanation

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