Week 2 - Significance & Changing Nature of Tuvan Throat Singing

Week 2 - Significance & Changing Nature of Tuvan Throat Singing

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The Significance and Changing  The Significance and Changing  Nature of Tuvan Throat Singing  Nature of Tuvan Throat Singing 
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Significance and music What does music mean to a culture? What functions does music serve in a culture? Meanings of khoomii Functions of khoomii
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Meaning in sound Origins of khoomii Mimesis (Greek for “imitation”) Singing not only imitative but literally shaped by environment “Khoomii on Horseback” (CD-9506, track 6) Animism (music and belief) Natural sounds imbued with spiritual power Connections with nature Insider meaning (emic)
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Common themes in khoomii Praise songs of native land and country (Tuva) Comparing a lover’s beauty with that of nature When I remember the Ulug- Khem It comes to me like the stem of a rose willow When I remember my sweetheart She comes to me lying, as if Awakening from sleep. When I remember the Kaa-Khem Its span is enormous. When I remember my dark-haired
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Unformatted text preview: sweetheart Smiling shyly, she comes to me, sitting down. Ghenhis Blues (video) Paul Pena Course themes: migration, memory, world music as global market place, dance, ritual/belief, politics, identity Kongar-ol Ondar: world music as global market place Khoomei competition: politics, identity Pauls first performance: sound (kargyraa, blues playing a dosh-poluur), setting (competition) Pauls last performance: sings kargyraa with borbannadir The Chadaana River: spiritual power ascribed to mountains and rivers (significance); ritual (araka, ceremonial beverage); washing in Chadaana will make singing stronger (imbued with spiritual power) Determinants of musical change Technology David Hykes (pp. xlvi-xlix) New, global sacred music Summary Khoomii and nature (setting) Significance and insider (Tuvan) meaning New soundscapes...
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course MUSIC 146 taught by Professor Garcia during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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Week 2 - Significance & Changing Nature of Tuvan Throat Singing

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