[01] Introduction to ARCH 350.pdf - ARCH 350 History and Theory of Modern and Contemporary Architecture Spring 2018 Instructor Dr Gabriela

[01] Introduction to ARCH 350.pdf - ARCH 350 History and...

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Unformatted text preview: ARCH 350 History and Theory of Modern and Contemporary Architecture Spring 2018 Instructor: Dr. Gabriela Campagnol [[email protected]] Dr. Gabriela Campagnol [email protected] Office: ARCA 437 Telephone: 979.845.7050 (office) Office Hours: check your syllabus for office hours, and by appointment (email preferably) (if the door is open please feel free to stop by) If you email me please write on the subject ARCH 350 + Section + Semester (i.e.: ARCH 350 700 Spring 18) "To be modern is not a fashion, it is a state. It is necessary to understand history, and he who understands history knows how to find continuity between that which was, that which is, and that which will be” Le Corbusier “Architecture is the thoughtful making of space” Louis Kahn ARCH 350 web-­CT Study images, outlines, syllabus, review, grades, etc: Arch 350 Course Description History and Theory of Modern and Contemporary Architecture (3-­0). Credit 3. Development of modern and contemporary architecture in the 20th and 21st centuries;; materials, structure, social and economic changes as well as architectural theory. Prerequisites: Junior or senior classification or approval of degree coordinator or instructor. This course fulfills University Core Curriculum requirements in the foundational component area of “Creative Arts”. This course also meets the International and Cultural Diversity requirements. Objectives and Learning Outcomes This course surveys important aspects of the 20th and 21st century architecture. This includes ideas (theories), movements, architects and buildings, and also modern materials, structural systems, social, political, economic, and urban developments. Students from outside the Department of Architecture are welcome in this class. This course aims to encourage the formulation of well-­grounded opinions upon built environment by referring the concepts, the visual and social consequences, the technology employed, and the cultural and historical context of their creation. This course is designed to: •Provide students with a sort of “cultural literacy” in modern and contemporary architecture and urban design. •Foster the analytical and critical potential of the student on the built environment. •Promote interdisciplinary approaches. Objectives and Learning Outcomes Every student will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of architecture through analysis of form, function, and context. By exploring the built environment, students will develop a critical approach to understanding elements of design, construction, and theory. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: • Visually recognize architectural illustrations (plans, elevations, sections) and identify main characteristics of modern architecture, recognizing influences and major concepts -­ identify buildings, ideas, and architects that portray Modern and Contemporary Architecture. [Knowledge]. Objectives and Learning Outcomes Every student will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of architecture through analysis of form, function, and context. By exploring the built environment, students will develop a critical approach to understanding elements of design, construction, and theory. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: • Describe, using formal and technical vocabulary, the defining characteristics of Modern and Contemporary buildings. [Knowledge]. Objectives and Learning Outcomes Every student will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of architecture through analysis of form, function, and context. By exploring the built environment, students will develop a critical approach to understanding elements of design, construction, and theory. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: • Distinguish significant developments in construction and design: concepts, architects and movements that shaped architecture into what it is today and how their ideas affect current design. [Comprehension]. Objectives and Learning Outcomes Every student will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of architecture through analysis of form, function, and context. By exploring the built environment, students will develop a critical approach to understanding elements of design, construction, and theory. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: • Interpret motivation and societal forces behind the design, and the process of creating new relevant forms. [Application]. Objectives and Learning Outcomes Every student will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of architecture through analysis of form, function, and context. By exploring the built environment, students will develop a critical approach to understanding elements of design, construction, and theory. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: • Build a chronological framework for understanding the development of construction techniques [Application]. • Apply critical thinking to theories in the history of architecture [Evaluation]. Reading and Resources Required textbook • Curtis, William. J. R. Modern Architecture since 1900. London: Phaindon, 1996. ISBN: 0714833568. or latest edition. • Puglisi, Luigi Prestinenza. New Directions in Contemporary Architecture: Evolutions and Revolutions in Building Design Since 1988. John Wiley & Son, 2008 • Completing reading assignments are strongly recommended so that you will be prepared to ask questions, participate in class discussions, and get a better performance in the exams! Reading and Resources Recommended Textbook • Frampton, Kenneth. Modern architecture: a Critical History. 4rd ed. London: Thames and Hudson, 2007. Performance Evaluation • Grades will be based on four required online exams (90%) and class participation assignments (10%) • There will be four online exams during the semester (4 X 22.5%= 90%). • The questions on each exam will consist of objective questions of different types (multiple-­choice, true/false, fill in the blank). Each exam will cover approximately three to four weeks of material presented in class, assigned reading, discussions, and assignments. • Participation Exercises and Video Assignments: 10% of the final course grade will comprise class participation exercises (vlogs, quizzes, discussion questions, lecture and video-­related questions, participation in the debates, etc.). • These exercises will be related to class content and sometimes distributed and collected in class and/or made available to students whose names appear on the roll sheet for the class period to which the exercise applies. (10%) • The exam is “open book”, and open note. • 50 questions drawn at random from a much larger test pool. Each question is worth 2 points and the exam is set to all-­or-­nothing so only responses that are entirely correct will receive credit. • The exam allows an unlimited number of attempts between its release and the submission deadline. Each new attempt will include a new set of questions drawn at random from the test pool. • The system is programmed to record the highest scoring attempt, but no scores will be visible in the gradebook until after the submission deadline. Performance Evaluation Exam Dates: Performance Evaluation The grading breakdown is as follows: Grade will be calculated on the basis of four required exams (4 X 22.5% = 90%) and class participation and video assignments (10%). Letter grades will be assigned according to the following guideline: A ³ 89.5% (Excellent) B ³ 79.5% (Good) C ³ 69.5% (Satisfactory) D ³ 59.5% (Passing) F < 59.5% (Failing) I = Incomplete Bonus points & extra-­credit assignments: Unannounced quizzes, homework assignments, attendance, class participation, and extra-­credit questions on the exams may count as extra-­credit towards the final grade. Maximum bonus point: 2% total (4 points) Performance Evaluation Your grade in this class is earned, not awarded! I will consider rounding up percentages of 9.5 and higher ONLY if there is a consistent trend of improvement, attendance, and class participation throughout the course. Grading Policy Makeup Policy: Makeup exams will be given without question for excused absences as defined by University regulations. If a student is unable to provide the documentation required for an excused absence, the instructor is under no obligation to provide a makeup exam. However, the instructor may offer a makeup exam but this may have a different format from that given in class and there will be a 10% penalty. Late Work Policy: Late assignments will be accepted without question for excused absences as defined by University regulations. Any late assignments without an excused absence will be accepted for a period of three days after the due date and will be assessed a 10% penalty. In-­Class Assessment ARCH 350 will develop teamwork skills through in-­ class activities, including minute papers, discussion in small groups and analytical exercises. These activities will provide models for students to share individual perspectives with each other and to develop more effective answers to questions that may appear on formal examinations. Important: I ask you to read pertinent sections of the texts prior to coming to class. It is very important that you do this reading so that you will be prepared to ask questions and to work on in-­class problems with your peers. I also ask to complete pertinent reading and video assignments associated with discussion topics. Questions related to in-­class activities may appear in the exams Attendance Because this is an online course, students are free to study and review the course materials at their convenience. Keeping up with and taking notes during the recorded lectures, completing all required readings, watching required videos in their entirety and studying prior to beginning each exam will improve each student’s chances for success. University rules concerning excused absences, which may pertain to scheduled exam dates and times, may be found at . University rules related to excused and unexcused absences are located on-­line at -­rules.tamu.edu/rule07 Project due dates will be provided in the project statements. Students should contact the instructor if work is turned in late due to an absence that is excused under the University’s attendance policy. In such cases the instructor will either provide the student an opportunity to make up any quiz, exam or other graded activities or provide a satisfactory alternative to be completed within 30 calendar days from the last day of the absence. There will be no opportunity for students to make up work missed because of an unexcused absence. Americas with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy Statement The American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-­discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Department of Student Life, Services for Students with Disabilities in Cain Hall, Rm. B118 or call 845-­ 1637. Student Conduct/ Academic Integrity “An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal or tolerate those who do.” Upon accepting admission to Texas A&M University, a student immediately assumes a commitment to uphold the Honor Code, to accept responsibility for learning, and to follow the philosophy and rules of the Honor System. Students will be required to state their commitment on examinations, research papers, and other academic work. Ignorance of the rules does not exclude any member of the TAMU community from the requirements or the processes of the Honor System. For additional information please visit: “On my honor, as an Aggie, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this academic work." Classroom Behavior Texas A&M University supports the principle of freedom of expression for both instructors and students. The university respects the rights of instructors to teach and students to learn. Maintenance of these rights requires classroom conditions that do not impede their exercise. Classroom behavior that seriously interferes with either (1) the instructor’s ability to conduct the class or (2) the ability of other students to profit from the instructional program will not be tolerated. An individual engaging in disruptive classroom behavior may be subject to disciplinary action. For additional information please visit: -­ rules.tamu.edu/rule21.htm Class schedule (subject to change) Note: Curtis = William Curtis’ textbook Modern Architecture since 1900 To get started: some definitions • Modernization • Modernity • Modernism (Source: Charles Harrison, "What is Modernism," in Modernism: Movements in Modern Art (London, Tate Gallery, 1997) Modernization A range of technological, economic and political processes associated with the industrial revolution and its aftermath (mechanization in communication, transportation and industrial production-­-­ urbanization is part of this process as well) Modernity The social conditions and modes of experience that are seen as the effects and affects of these processes -­ the mental and emotional states triggered and inspired by these unprecedented changes in human society Modernism Term applied to the invention and the effective pursuit of artistic strategies that seek not just close but essential connections to the powerful forces of social Modernity. There is no universally-­accepted definition of the term, but one characteristic of Modernism is important for our understanding of the visual cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries is that Modern artists & architects worked more toward the creation of something new than toward the destruction of everything familiar: the basic impulse of modernism within modernity is the drive to create previously unimagined objects and new ways of seeing them (the visual and textual forms created to express these new mental and emotional states) Zeitgeist?! All design endeavors express the zeitgeist…ZEITGEIST?? “Spirit of an age”: the sensibility of an era, the general mood of its people, tenor of public discourse, the flavor of daily life, the intellectual inclinations and biases that underlie human endeavor. Zeitgeist of Modern Era?! We can summarize the primary intellectual trends as “a favoring of truths revealed by scientific method” And the Postmodern and Current Era?! “An inclination to hold that truth is relative or impossible to know” Modern Architecture? Think of three “isms” : •Industrialism •Rationalism •Functionalism ANCIENT CLASSICAL GOTHIC RENAISS. BAROQUE NEO-­CLASSICAL MODERN Timeline based on Zeuler Lima 2008 1400 1300 1600 1500 1492 Columbus ‘discovers’ America 1450 Printing Press Before 1100 Architectural Glass ANCIENT CLASSICAL GOTHIC RENAISS. BAROQUE NEO-­CLASSICAL MODERN Timeline based on Zeuler Lima 2008 1800 1969 Man on the Moon WW 2 1939 World War II WW 1 1914 World War I 1903 Wright Brother’s Fly 2000 1900 Telephone / Light bulb 1870s 1890s Reinforced Concrete 1870s 1852 Safety Elevator by Otis 1850s Iron & Steel 1756 “Rediscovery" of concrete 1700 MODERN POST MODERN CONTEMPORARY THEORIES & PRACTICES 2000s 1980s Adaptive Reuse Fabrication/ Digital Fab. Parametric design 2020 New organic architecture Ecology/ Sustainability Computational Creativity Globalization Fragmentation High Tech Architecture Mass media Before 1960s "To be modern is not a fashion, it is a state. It is necessary to understand history, and he who understands history knows how to find continuity between that which was, that which is, and that which will be” (Le Corbusier) “Architecture is the thoughtful making of space” (Louis Kahn) Dr. Gabriela Campagnol [email protected] Office: ARCA 437 Telephone: 979.845.7050 (office) Office Hours: check your syllabus for office hours, and by appointment (email preferably) (if the door is open please feel free to stop by) If you email me please write on the subject ARCH 350 + Section + Semester (i.e.: ARCH 350 700 Spring 18) ...
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  • Spring '17
  • Dr. Sarah Deyong
  • Architecture, Theory  of  Modern  and  Contemporary, Learning  Outcomes, Dr.  Gabriela  Campagnol, modern  architecture

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