Week 6 Music and Dance - Polka

Week 6 Music and Dance - Polka - Music and Dance: Polka...

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Music and Dance: Music and Dance: Polka Polka
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Polka’s origins and dissemination Origins: Bohemia, early  19 th  century Popularization across  Europe Sheet music Sound recordings
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Polka’s ethnic significance in the U.S. Central European immigration, 1848-1917 Four major Central European “polka cultures” in the  U.S. 1. American Dutchman (German American) style, 1840s 2. Czech-Bohemian American style (Texas, Midwest)  3. Polish American style (East coast to Midwest) 4. Slovenian American style
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Polka in American popular culture  Recordings and jukeboxes Late-1940s polka craze 1. Polish American bands began to play polka for non-Polish  audiences in urban areas by the 1940s 2. Frankie Yankovic (Slovenian-American) scored several cross-over  polka hits (“Just  Because”) 3. Lawrence Welk (Russian German immigrant from North Dakota),  TV, 1950s-1970s  The American polka belt
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Week 6 Music and Dance - Polka - Music and Dance: Polka...

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