Research Paper Final Draft.docx - Warren 1 Samuel Warren Professor Nancy Jensen Writing 2010 Drug Companies and Doctors According to a recent analysis

Research Paper Final Draft.docx - Warren 1 Samuel Warren...

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Warren 1Samuel WarrenProfessor Nancy JensenWriting 20107/26/2018Drug Companies and DoctorsAccording to a recent analysis published by ProPublica, a nonprofit investigative journalist organization, doctors who receive money from drug manufacturers tend to prescribe a higher percentage of brand-name drugs compared to their colleagues who don’t receive that money (Ornstein et al). Until ProPublica’s study, there has been little to no evidence to support this controversial theory. These new findings have reinvigorated professionals like Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, a Harvard Medical School associate professor, who have been searching for justification for this line of thinking. He says, “Hopefully we’re getting past the point where people say, ‘[T]here’s no evidence that these relationships change physicians’ prescribing practices.’” Although these results follow logical reasoning, many in the medical field harbor a resentful attitude towards the idea that outside business dealings could affect their patient care. According to Doctors Kshirsagar and Vu from the University of California Irvine Medical School, the pharmaceutical industry spent more than $14 billion dollars in medical school marketing over three years, which is more than $8,000 per physician in the US. This allegedly “directly affected [medical students], enticing them to prescribe the latest pharmaceuticals.” (Kshirsagar et al). Dr. Walid Gellad, a University of Pittsburgh professor and co-director of its pharmaceutical center, states that, “You can debate if these payments are good or bad, or neither, but what isn’t debatable is that they permeate the profession.” (Ornstein et al). The data that these professionals uncovered demonstrates an existent correlation between pharmaceutical
Warren 2company’s involvement in medical schools and the number of doctors who prescribe big name drugs, and the relationship between these businesses and medical schools must be reevaluated in order to ensure ethical medicinal practice.Doctors are trained to treat symptoms and disease with a myriad of medical devices, drugs, and prescriptive advice (Ahmed). This has resulted in a modern healthcare system that improves quality of life, longevity, and comfort for millions, but sometimes abuse of or too muchof a good thing can have detrimental effects. With modern medicine composed almost exclusively of inpatient and outpatient clinical care, the drug industry has become a booming part of business life in America, with pharmaceutical companies seeking to make a profit off of avery profitable business sector. Morally blind logic suggests that ethics can be swept aside in pursuit of financial gain, and many healthcare professionals have denied for decades any stemming effects from drug company meddling (Glover). ProPublica’s study is the final nail in the proverbial coffin which puts that denial to rest. The facts, according to the study, demonstrate

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