MARK4210 Class 10 product Swatch case.pdf - Product Strategy MARK4210 Spring 2018 Course Roadmap Fundamentals Elements of Marketing Strategy Application

MARK4210 Class 10 product Swatch case.pdf - Product...

This preview shows page 1 - 11 out of 17 pages.

Product StrategyMARK4210 Spring 2018
Background image
Situation Analysis(Customer, Competitor, Company)Market Selection(Segmentation, Targeting, Positioning)Marketing Mix Formulation(Product, Pricing, Distribution, Promotion)- Quantitative Analysis- Consumer BehaviorSimulation GamePharmaSimElements of Marketing StrategyFundamentals ApplicationCourse Roadmap
Background image
Background image
The Birth of the SwatchCase Discussion Questions:1.Prior to Swatch, what was the watch industry like in various historical stages (prior to 1950s, between 1950s-1970s, 1970s-1980s)? Consider the various aspects of the watch category (e.g., category usage, marketing mix, consumer behavior).2.Why did Swatch become a success, what are the key elements of their marketing plan (e.g., positioning, marketing mix) that contributed to their success?3.How has Swatch influenced/impacted the watch industry in terms of how people view the category and consumer behavior?
Background image
Swatch: Company BackgroundSSIH & ASUAG (parent companies) faced insolvency in 1983; potentially selling premium brands to Japanese companiesInefficient structures – separate watch companies within companies; own marketing, own R&D, own manufacturing1945: Swiss companies had 80% of watch market 15% in 1983
Background image
The Watch Industry Pre-SwatchPrior to 1950s19511970sPositioningA specialized form of jewelryFunctional tools --rugged, utilitarian, and masculineCheap jewelryProductContained jewels; require great care and precision; handed down from one generation to nextTimex. inexpensive mechanical watches using hard alloy bearings instead of jewelsQuartz technology. Mimic the traditional appearance of more expensive, Swiss-made mechanical counterparts.ChannelSold through jewels and upscale department stores, repaired by jewelers. Drugstores, discount houses/shopsDepartment stores (n/a in the case)Jewelers (n/a in the case)PromotionMacho "torture tests" that mocked the delicacy of high-end watchesAdPricingFinancial investment; probably on par with Jewelry$6.95-$7.95; so low that they were considered disposableBetween $50 to $350
Background image
Market share continuously dropped80% of the world's total watch production prior to 1950Global share declined from 80% in 1946 to 42% in 1970Market share in different price segments$350+ watches: ~ 8 million units, 97% Swiss$100~$350 watches: ~42 million units, 3% Swiss<$100 watches: 450 million units, 0% SwissCompanies in lower price categories moving up to compete with Swiss companiesThe Watch Industry Pre-Swatch
Background image
Swatch’s Marketing Mix: ProductUse bold, intense colors and designs (compared to watches before which were black, brown, or white) Designed in the Swatch Design Lab by artists, architects rather than engineersInnovations that are non-functional but playful and provocative (e.g., see-through watch, scented watch) Clever branding: “Swatch” – traditional perceptions of Swiss quality/reliability, but also friendly, approachable, trendyExpressive colors and unpredictable designs sent a strong message that Swatches were note merely designed to measure time, but to make a fashion statement
Background image
Swatch’s Marketing Mix: Product LinesTremendous diversity, 70 designs that changed 2x/year; which encouraged the perception that watches were accessories to be mixed-and-matched depending on one's outfit, mood, or tasteCollections changed on a seasonal basisNo repeat production runsLimited editionsManaged the product line according to practices of the fashion industry
Background image
Background image
Image of page 11

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 17 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture