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Lab1_Culture Transfer Techniques.docx - BIOS242, Week 1,...

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BIOS242, Week 1, Lab 1Name:Lab 1: Culture Transfer TechniquesLearning Objectives:Understand the concept of aseptic technique and its importance in the field of microbiology.Learn proper aseptic technique.Become familiar with different forms of basic growth mediaTransfer a pure bacterial culture from one growth media to another, a process called sub-culturing.Introduction:Microorganisms are everywhere in our environment, in the air, the soil, on surfaces (fomites), and onand in living things.In a hospital setting, contamination of clinical samples may have an impact on thediagnosis and treatment of patients.Experimental results from pure cultures, which contain a singletype of microorganism, can be skewed and produce erroneous results when contaminated withexogenous microorganisms.Unwanted microorganisms can be introduced into samples by direct contact with contaminated surfacesor hands by touching either the media or the inner surfaces of the culture tube with objects that havenot been sterilized.In addition, microbes in the air can enter tubes and plates of growth media by wayof air currents.Aseptic techniques are designed to prevent unwanted microorganisms from contaminating either sterilematerials or pure cultures. If bacteria are handled correctly, only the desired organisms will grow ontransfer cultures. Using proper aseptic technique, following the transfer of a sample from a pure cultureonly that bacterium will grow. This process is called subculturing and is used to maintain the cells as wellas keep them in an active growth phase for experiments.In these procedures it is critical to applyaseptic technique to prevent contamination of cultures.The growth and survival of microorganisms require a source of nutrients and a favorable environment.For example, bacteria which grow in the human gut may grow better at body temperature than roomtemperature.While some microorganisms have very specific growth requirements, many bacteria can

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Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Microbiology, Bacteria, Agar plate, Agar, Microbiological culture, broth culture

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