1315-10 Carbonation Release.pdf - Experiment 10 Climate...

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Experiment 10Climate ThemeFull Report/ Peer Review1Name: _______________________CHEM 1315 Section: ___________Carbonation ReleasePrelab AssignmentRead the introduction section. Submit your completed prelab assignment to your TA before youbegin the lab, according to the deadline set in the syllabus. Determine the data you will becollecting and prepare appropriate tables.Experimental OverviewThis experiment has 2 parts. In Part I, you will react sodium bicarbonate with acetic acid andmonitor the pressure change. In Part II, you change the temperature of the reaction product andmonitor the pressure. As this experiment is for your final lab report, you need to developappropriate tables and graphs to best relate your findings.IntroductionWhen a gas is produced during a chemical reaction, the pressure of the reaction system willchange depending on how much gas is produced. This is one way to determine how much ofthe reactants have reacted. The relationship between pressure, volume, temperature andamount of gas (in moles) is given by the Ideal Gas Law.P V = n R TIn the Ideal Gas Law, P is pressure (in atm), V is volume (in L), n is moles, R is the Universalgas constant (in L atm mol-1K-1) and T is temperature (in K). There are considerations that addcorrection terms to this ideal law, but this equation fits the majority of systems we encounterunder normal atmospheric pressure and classroom temperatures.ApplicationThe composition of gases in Earth’s atmosphere stronglyaffects the surface climate andenvironment of the planet. Dinitrogen, N2, and dioxygen, O2, are the major components of theatmosphere. Water vapor is commonly included as a major component as well. Minorcomponents such as argon, carbon dioxide, neon, and methane are also present.1Many physical properties are similar between these molecules, such as how pressureand temperature influence them in the gas phase. The density of dinitrogen and dioxygen gaswill behave similarly when the temperature is adjusted. However, other physical propertiescause gas molecules to behave quite differently. For example, water vapor can absorb sunlight
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Term
Spring
Professor
Clifford

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