Note to Students as You Begin to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Note to Students as You Begin to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X

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Note to Students as You Begin to Read The Autobiography of Malcolm X In this section of the class, we will examine the ways in which human life is defined by traditions, including religious traditions. Human life, we will see, is largely a matter of taking up the norms, values, narratives, characters, and roles we inherit from our traditions. We become who we are as unique individuals by living out the roles traditions give us to play. For example, in a family, girls are expected to play the role of sister and daughter—roles defined largely by cultural traditions. In education, we are expected to take up the goals of the student as our own , i.e., to develop discipline, curiosity, integrity, critical reasoning skills, etc. In our careers, e.g., as an artist, banker, engineer, etc., we enter into a history of practices that carry many specific goals with them. Such goals define what it means to be excellent in that field. Thus by entering that field of work, one submits to being judged those traditional definitions.
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course 032 002 taught by Professor Adamson during the Spring '08 term at University of Iowa.

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Note to Students as You Begin to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X

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