Cognition-and-Learning.doc - 9 DIMENSIONS OF NEED COGNITION...

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9. DIMENSIONS OF NEED: COGNITION AND LEARNING NEEDS Introduction The Code of Practice defines Cognition and Learning difficulties as referring to children and young people who: Learn at a slower pace than their peers, even with appropriate differentiation Show features of moderate (MLD), severe (SLD) and profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) Show specific difficulties learning difficulties (SpLD) with one or more aspects of learning. This encompasses a range of difficulties including: dyslexia, dyspraxia, development coordination disorder (DCD), dysgraphia and dyscalculia 1. SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES (SpLD) SpLD is an umbrella term which emphasises the differences that pupils display across their learning. Pupils with SpLD may have a particular difficulty in learning to read, write, spell or manipulate numbers so that their performance in these areas is below their performance in other areas. Pupils may also have problems with short-term memory, with organisational skills and with coordination. Pupils with SpLD cover the whole ability range and the severity of their impairment varies widely. SPLD: Literacy difficulties Some children find gaining literacy skills easy whilst others struggle in the initial stages (learning or hearing sounds) or in the later stages (gaining whole word recognition or applying spelling knowledge). These children may need a multi-sensory teaching intervention and additional resources to support their literacy development. There is a responsibility for teachers to tailor provision for children with literacy difficulties using the graduated response. Assessment of children with literacy difficulties should not only consider what the pupil can or can’t do but also involves looking at teaching and learning styles of the class teacher. It is important to review interventions frequently to assess whether they are having an impact and also considering if they need to be altered to suit the needs of the child. 1
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Dyslexia If a child is struggling with reading and writing, it is important to structure interventions so that they can make progress. Multi- sensory teaching interventions for children with literacy difficulties should be structured, cumulative and incorporate overlearning and should be suitable for most children. The lack of a dyslexia diagnosis should not prevent a child from accessing an intervention that would support their literacy development. There has been much discussion about the nature of dyslexia and historically there has been no single agreed definition. In 2009 Sir Jim Rose’s Report on 'Identifying and Teaching Children and Young People with Dyslexia and Literacy Difficulties’ gave the following description of dyslexia: 'Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that primarily affects the skills involved in accurate and fluent word reading and spelling.
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  • Spring '17
  • william james
  • Educational Psychology, Teaching assistant, Motor control, Dyslexia, difficulties, sen support plan

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