notecards - Odysseus and Calypso Bocklin, Arnold 1883 •...

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Unformatted text preview: Odysseus and Calypso Bocklin, Arnold 1883 • The Odyssey book V • Calypso: naiad & daughter of Atlas who lived on Gozo island • She delayed Odysseus on her island for 7 years of sexual imprisonment, b/c she was in love with him • Athena asked Zeus to spare Odysseus of his torment on the island, as he wanted to go to his homeland. • Odysseus eventually returned to his homeland of Ithaca, to be with his beloved wife Penelope who waited for him at home, even though Calypso had promised him immortality if he stayed. • Most see an engulfment by the "instinctual female principle, physically vital, but intellectually and spiritually lifeless." For the hero adventurer, the apparent "effortlessness of existence" would always be a kind of living death. For only inaction can he find his identity: only by struggle a he maintain his reality.... So this adventuresome hero must live without adventure for seven full years. • This moody & mysterious painting suggests the tension b/w the two Ulysses Recognized by His Dog Durand, 1810 • Odysseus, naked but for a cloak draped over his left shoulder, extends his left hand around his staff to touch his dog’s muzzle, which is raised in recognition. • This scene comes at the end of The Odyssey , in which Odysseus looks at his now-old dog, moved by its current life as an abject, often disregarded creature. • The plaster perfectly captures the lean, hard, muscled body of Odysseus, who, despite his heroic status, is moved by the encounter. • But if we concentrate on the forms themselves, the clarity of the lines defining Odysseus’ body and cloak, as well as the treatment of the hound, serve a deeper purpose: a retelling of a tale that emphasizes strength of character as much as openness of feeling. Ulysses and the Sirens (detail of Ulysses Bound to the Mast) Tunisian, Late Antique, 3 rd Century, Mosaic • In Greek mythology, the Sirens are creatures with the head of a female and the body of a bird. They lived on an island (Sirenum scopuli; three small rocky islands) and with the irresistible charm of their song they lured mariners to their destruction on the rocks surrounding their island (Virgil V, 846; Ovid XIV, 88). • When on another journey the Odysseus ' ship passed the Sirens, had the sailors stuff their ears with wax. He had himself tied to the mast for he wanted to hear their beautiful voices. The Sirens sang when they approached, their words even more enticing than the melody. • They would give knowledge to every man who came to them, they said, ripe wisdom and a quickening of the spirit. Odysseys' heart ran with longing but the ropes held him and the ship quickly sailed to safer waters Hector Taking Leave of Andromache Jean Restout 1728, Book VI The Iliad • The Greeks attack and drive the Trojans back. Hector must now go out to lead a counter-attack....
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2008 for the course ART 1300 taught by Professor Mikash,lin during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

  • Spring '07
  • MIKASH,LIN
  • The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Iliad, Fire, Aeneas, Juno, Dido, Anchises, Jupiter, Venus, Ascanius, Creusa, Aeolus, Andromache, Apollo, Mercury, Neptune, Achilles, Aeneas, Andromache, Apollo, Athena, Menelaus, Odysseus, Poseidon, Zeus, Fate, Odysseus, Telemachus, Penelope, Athena, Zeus, Poseidon, Achilles, Aeolus, Alcinous, Calypso, Circe, Hermes, Menelaus, Nausicaa, Polyphemus, Sirens

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notecards - Odysseus and Calypso Bocklin, Arnold 1883 •...

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