HIST-1301.pdf - United States History(HIST 1301 Credit 3...

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Unformatted text preview: United States History (HIST 1301) Credit: 3 semester credit hours (3 hours lecture) Prerequisite/Co-requisite: Passed the reading portion of COMPASS or other accepted testing instrument. Course Description A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic creation of the federal government. Required Textbook and Materials 1. Introduction to American History: Volume 1 to 1877 By Brian Farmer a. ISBN number is 978-1-60229-875-0 2. Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Radical for Women's Rights (Library of American Biography Series) By Lois W. Banner a. ISBN number is 0673393194 3. Andrew Jackson and the Search for Vindication (Library of American Biography Series) By James C. Curtis a. ISBN number is 0673393348 Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Create an argument through the use of historical evidence. (SCANS: C1, C5, C15, F1, F5, F10, F1, F12) 2. Analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources. (SCANS C3, C5, C6, C7, C15, C16, F1, F2, F3, F10, F11) Analyze the effects of historical, social, political, economic, cultural, and global forces on this period of United States history. (SCANS: C1, C3, C5, C6, C7, C12, C13, C14, C15, F2, F8, F10) SCANS Skills and Competencies Beginning in the late 1980’s, the U.S. Department of Labor Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) conducted extensive research and interviews with business owners, union leaders, supervisors, and laborers in a wide variety of work settings to determine what knowledge workers needed in order to perform well on a job. HIST 1301 Course Syllabus In 1991 the Commission announced its findings in What Work Requires in Schools. In its research, the Commission determined that “workplace know-how” consists of two elements: foundation skills and workplace competencies. Course Outline a. Puritan Origins: The English Reformation b. Puritan Settlement of New England c. The Evolution of New England Society d. The Founding of the Middle Colonies e. The Colonies and the British Empire f. Conclusion: An English Model of Colonization in North America E. The British Empire and the Colonial Crisis, 1754-1775 a. A Growing Population and Expanding Economy in British North America b. New England: From Puritan Settlers to Yankee Traders c. The Middle Colonies: Immigrants, Wheat, and Work d. The Southern Colonies: Land of Slavery e. Unifying Experiences f. Bonds of the British Empire g. Conclusion: The Dual Identity of British North American Colonist F. The War For America, 1775-1783 a. The Seven Years’ War, 1754-1763 b. The Sugar and Stamp Acts, 1763-1765 c. The Townshends Acts and Economic Retaliation, 1767-1771 d. The Tea Party and Coercive Acts, 1770-1774 e. Domestic Insurrection, 1774-1775 f. Conclusion: How Far does Liberty Go G. Building a Republic, 1775-1789 A. Europeans Encounter The New World, 1492-1600 a. Archeology and History b. The First Americans c. Archaic Hunters and Gathers d. Agricultural Settlements and Chiefdoms e. Native Americans in the 1490’s f. The Mexia: A MesoAmerican Culture g. Conclusion: The World of Ancient Americans B. The Southern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700 a. Europe in the Age of Exploration b. A Surprising New World in the Western Atlantic c. Spanish Exploration and Conquest d. The New World and Sixteenth Century Europe e. Conclusion: The Promise of the New World for Europeans C. The Northern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-170 a. An English Convoy on the Chesapeake b. A Tobacco Society c. The Evolution of Chesapeake Society d. Religion and Revolt in the Spanish Borderland e. Toward a Slave Labor System f. Conclusion: The Growth of English Colonies Based on Export Crops and Slave Labor D. Colonial America in the Eighteenth Century, 1701-1770 2 HIST 1301 Course Syllabus a. The Articles of Confederation b. The Sovereign States c. The Confederation’s Problem d. The United States Constitution e. Ratification of the Constitution f. Conclusion: Republican Remedy H. The New Nation Takes Form, 17891800 a. The Search for Stability b. Hamilton’s Economic Policies c. Conflicts West, East, and South d. Federalist and Republicans e. Conclusions: Parties Nonetheless I. Republicans in Power, 1800-1824 a. Jefferson’s Presidency b. The Madisons in the White House c. Women’s Status in the Early Republic d. Monroe and Adams e. Conclusion: Republican Simplicity Becomes Complex J. The Expanding Republic, 18151840 a. The Market Revolution b. The Spread of Democracy c. Jackson Defines the Democratic Party d. Cultural Shifts, Religion, and Reform e. Van Buren’s One-Term Presidency f. Conclusion: The Age of Jackson or the Era of Reform K. The New West and the Free North, 1840-1860 a. Economic and Industrial Revolution b. Free Labor: Promise and Reality L. M. N. O. 3 c. The Westward Movement d. Expansion and the Mexican American War e. Reforming Self and Society f. Conclusion: Free Labor, Free Men The Slave South, 1820-1860 a. The Growing Distinctiveness of the South b. Masters, Mistresses, and the Big House c. Slave and the Quarter d. Black and Free: On the Middle Ground e. The Plain Folk f. The Politics of Slavery g. Conclusion: A Slave Society The House Divided, 1846-1861 a. The Bitter Fruits of War b. The Sectional Balance Undone c. Realignment of the Party System d. Freedom Under Siege e. The Union Collapses f. Conclusion: Slavery, Free Labor, and the Failure of Political Compromise The Crucible of War, 1861-1865 a. “And the War Came” b. The Combatants c. Battling It Out, 1861-1862 d. Union and Freedom e. The South at War f. The North at War g. Grinding Out Victory, 1863-1865 h. Conclusion: The Second American Revolution Reconstruction: a. Wartime Reconstruction b. Presidential Reconstruction c. Congressional Reconstruction d. The Struggle in the South e. Reconstruction Collapses f. Conclusion: “A Revolution But Half Accomplished” HIST 1301 Course Syllabus Grade Scale 90 – 100 80 – 89 70 – 79 60 – 69 0 – 59 A B C D F Course Evaluation Final grades will be calculated according to the following criteria: 4 Tests 50% of final grade 2 Papers 40% of final grade Attendance and Participation 10% of final grade Course Requirements Students are required to attend all classes and be prepared to work. Students must have all needed supplies as none will be supplied for them. Students will be required to take notes, participate in class discussions, write critical reviews on the supplemental books and take all exams. Students are not allowed to have cell phones out at any time. Course Policies 1. Cheating of any kind will not be tolerated. For first offense students will receive an F on the assignment, second offensives will result in an F in the class. 2. If you wish to drop a course, the student is responsible for initiating and dropping the course. If you stop logging-in to the course and do not complete the course drop process, then you will receive an “F” grade for the course 3. Internet Usage – Students are expected to use proper net etiquette while participating in course emails, assignment submissions, and online discussions. Disabilities Statement The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1992 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are federal anti-discrimination statutes that provide comprehensive civil rights for persons with disabilities. Among other things, these statutes require that all students with documented disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodations for their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Special Populations Coordinator at (409) 880-1737 or visit the office in Student Services, Cecil Beeson Building. Course Schedule Week 1 2 3 4 Topic Ancient America: Before 1492 Europeans Encounter the New World, 1492-1600 The Southern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700 The Northern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700 4 HIST 1301 Course Syllabus Week 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Topic First Exam Colonial America in the Eighteenth Century, 1701-1770 First Book Test The British Empire and the Colonial Crisis, 1754-1775 The War for America, 1775-1783 Building a Republic, 1775-1789 Second Exam The New Nation Takes Form, 1789-1800 Republicans in Power, 1800-1824 The Expanding Republic, 1815-1840 The New West and Free North, 1840-1860 Third Exam The Slave South, 1820-1860 Second Book Test The House Divided, 1846-1861 The Crucible of War, 1861-1865 Reconstruction, 1863-1877 Final Exam given on the date and time specified by the official exam schedule. 5 ...
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