Counselor Ethical Boundaries and Practices - Final.docx - Running head COUNSELOR ETHICAL BOUNDARIES AND PRACTICES Counselor Ethical Boundaries and

Counselor Ethical Boundaries and Practices - Final.docx -...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 8 pages.

Running head: COUNSELOR ETHICAL BOUNDARIES AND PRACTICES Counselor Ethical Boundaries and Practices Julie Sheehan Grand Canyon University PCN 505 Dr. Cassie Rushing March 28, 2018 1
Image of page 1
Running head: COUNSELOR ETHICAL BOUNDARIES AND PRACTICES When we talk about ethics we are talking about a set of moral principles or rules of conduct and boundaries are limits that cannot be crossed. This paper will be about the ethical boundaries and practices that a counselor must follow. The paper will consist of four parts which are boundary issues and dual relationships, professional collaborations in counseling, relations with supervisors and colleagues and the last part will be what I think about ethical thinking. Boundary Issues and Dual Relationships When we are counselors we have certain responsibilities and boundaries that we must always be aware of and follow when it comes to dual relationships or boundary crossing. When we talk about boundaries this refers to self-disclosure, touch, exchange of gifts and bartering ("Zur Institute Inc", 1995-2018). The dual relationship is considered when a connection exists between a therapist and a client and this would include sexual relationships, counseling their friends or immediate family and could extend to business associates to the client (“NAADAC”, 2016). Before a counselor decides to cross boundaries or have a duel relationship they should ask themselves some questions. The first one being should I do it and if I do it what are the risks involved or if there are any benefits to it. Another question that should be asked is if it would ethical. A counselor should always keep in mind the welfare of the client and the therapeutic effect it would have on them ("Zur Institute Inc", 1995-2018). Both the ACA and the NAADAC offer ways to ensure that the counselor is doing right by the client such as seek advice from a supervisor, sign an informed consent, and proper documentation will need to be completed to ensure that there is no harm done to the client (“NAADAC”, 2016). Sometimes it when you are counseling people dual relationships can come up and it is your job as a counselor to make the judgement call to either continue or stop. Both the ACA and NAADAC make it clear that a 2
Image of page 2
Running head: COUNSELOR ETHICAL BOUNDARIES AND PRACTICES counselor’s biggest responsibility is that no harm or exploitation is done to the client. Below are some examples of dual relationships and what the counselor should do. Example one: If you were counseling someone and you needed to have the family present on a few occasions and you noticed that one of the family members went to the same coffee shop that you go to and have said hello a few times and we talked for a few minutes. Now this would be okay if it was any other person but since it was a family member of your patient then it gets to be complex.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Winter '16
  • Laura Pipoly
  • Ethics, supervisor, American Counseling Association, COUNSELOR ETHICAL BOUNDARIES

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture