Couse outline.pdf - LAW122 Introduction to Business Law...

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Unformatted text preview: LAW122: Introduction to Business Law Fall 2016 (Section 121) Course Outline INSTRUCTOR: Maanit Zemel OFFICE: TRS 03-039 TEL: 416 979-5000, ext. 2472 or 2471 E-MAIL: [email protected] OFFICE HOURS: Tuesdays, 1:00pm to 3:00pm. No appointment necessary. First come first serve. CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Tuesdays, 3:00pm to 6:00pm, KHE-127 Course Description This is an introductory course, prerequisite to further studies in law. The course begins with a discussion of the nature and sources of law and an examination of the court system in Canada, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and a survey of the more important aspects of the law of torts. The course then concentrates on the legal requirements for the formation of a valid contract. Other major contract law topics include interpretation, privity, discharge, breach, and special types of contracts. Selected cases will be examined. This course, including all communications with the instructor, does not constitute legal advice, but academic information only. If you require legal advice to rely upon, you should retain a lawyer. Course Objectives Upon successful completion of the course of study, you should have a practical knowledge of the basic legal issues involved in business decision-making, in the areas of tort and contract law, as well as an understanding of the impact of the Constitution and the Charter and how the court system works. Ethical Understanding & Reasoning: upon successful completion of the course of study, you should be able to recognize and analyze ethical problems in order to choose and defend appropriate resolutions. Required Text and Other Materials McInnes et al., Managing the Law: The Legal Aspects of Doing Business, 4th edition (Toronto: Pearson Canada, 2013). From time to time, other materials may be added to the scheduled reading. You are responsible for these materials just as you are responsible for what is in the textbooks, and may be tested on them as well. 1 Communicating with your Instructor D2L will be used in this course for both administrative and course-content purposes. You must have a D2L account and you are responsible for checking it regularly for information concerning this course, as some information may be released only through D2L. To communicate with your instructor please use only the email address above. No grades will be issued by email. Emails will be responded within 2 business days. If your inquiry requires longer and more complex communication, or if you have not received a reply to your email within 2 business days, please contact the instructor via telephone at the phone number listed above or in person during office hours. Students must use their Ryerson email address, and must put their class code in the subject line, followed by the reason for their email. Any matters that may affect the student’s performance in the course must be raised with the instructor as soon as they are known to the student. Please do not rely on last minute assistance. The best method of receiving course related help is to come to class prepared, ask informed questions there, and during office hours. Method of Instruction and Evaluation Course instruction is based primarily on classroom lectures and discussions of assigned readings. Recording of lectures by any means (sound, video, picture etc.) without the permission of the instructor is strictly prohibited. Your final grade is based upon your performance in the following course requirements: Type of Assessment Weight Written assignment on ethical 10% reasoning 1st Mid-term Test – 1 hour long 25% Date Nov. 15 2nd Mid-term Test – 1 hour long Final Exam – 2 hours TOTAL Nov. 8 TBA Oct. 4 25% 40% 100% Please note that: - More detailed information about each of the assessments will be available on D2L. Students will receive the results of their first test before the final deadline for dropping courses without academic penalty. - Any change to this evaluation scheme will be discussed in class prior to implementation. - Written assignment, mid-term and final exams will be based on materials covered in lectures, class discussions, textbook, supplementary materials and handouts. - All Law122 daytime students will write a common final examination. 2 - Unless otherwise announced, the final exam is cumulative and covers all chapters and materials in the course. You MUST pass the comprehensive final exam in order to pass the course. You MUST complete the written assignment on ethical reasoning in order to pass the course. Failure to complete any of the course requirements may result in an “Incomplete” or “F” grade. Where there are different instructors teaching different sections of this course, evaluations during the course of the term may vary in content, timing, weight and format among the various instructors according to their discretion and best judgment. Class structure: - As a general rule, classes will consist of a two hour, more traditional lecture, followed by one hour of instruction that is more akin to a seminar. Active class participation is encouraged. In order to make the most of this class structure, it is essential to come to class prepared to discuss the materials. Academic Consideration & Missed Evaluations Students must submit assignments on time and write all tests and exams as scheduled. Assignments submitted for grading will be handed back within two weeks except for the final exam. Marks for tests will be posted within two weeks of the tests; tests written in Law 122 are not returned to students, although students may view their graded tests under supervision. Students who fail to complete an assignment (including missing a test or examination) will receive a “0” (zero) on the assignment unless the student has a justifiable reason for the absence/failure to complete the assignment. There will be no penalty for work missed for a justifiable reason. Students need to inform the instructor of any situation that arises during the semester that may have an adverse effect on their academic performance, and request any necessary considerations according to the policies and well in advance. Failure to do so will jeopardize any academic appeals. Except in cases of accommodations for disabilities, where documentation is handled directly by the Access Centre, students must fill out an Academic Consideration form [ df] and submit it to their own program office: TRSBM: Submit documentation forms to the Student Achievement Office Program Assistants at the front desk in TRS 1-004 in person or can be placed in the Academic Consideration Forms Drop box in TRS 1-002 which is available to students Monday to Friday from 6:30 am to 11:00 pm and weekend until 8:00 pm. HTM office – TRS 3-002 (Front Desk Staff) HSM office – TRS 2-042 (Front Desk Staff) ITM office – TRS 2-004 (Front Desk Staff) 3 RM office – TRS 3-172 (Front Desk Staff) In addition, the following procedures must be followed as well: o Medical certificates – If a student is going to miss a deadline for an assignment, a test or an examination because of illness, he/she must submit a medical certificate (see for the certificate) to their program office within 3 working days of the missed assignment deadline, test or examination. The program office will notify the instructor that the documents have been received. It is the student’s responsibility to make arrangements with instructor for a make-up exam. o Religious observance – While it is strongly encouraged that students make requests within the first two weeks of class, requests for accommodation of specific religious or spiritual observance must be presented to their program office no later than two weeks prior to the conflict in question (in the case of final examinations within two weeks of the release of the examination schedule). The student must submit a Request for Accommodation form ( ) to their program office. The office will notify the instructor when they have received the request form. o Other requests for Academic Consideration which are not related to medical or religious observation must be submitted in writing together with the Academic Consideration form to the student’s program office. The letter must clearly state the reasons for the request and describe the events or circumstances that seriously impair the student’s ability to meet their academic obligations, and that were beyond the student’s control. When possible, supporting documentation must be attached to the letter. The office will notify the instructor when they have received the request. o Students with disabilities - In order to facilitate the academic success and access of students with disabilities, these students should register with the Access Centre . Before the first graded work is due, students should also inform their instructor through an “Accommodation Form for Professors” that they are registered with the Access Centre and what accommodations are required. o Regrading or recalculation – These requests must be made to the instructor within 10 working days of the return of the graded assignment to the class. These are not grounds for appeal, but are matters for discussion between the student and the instructor. Submission of the Academic Consideration form and all supporting documentation to your program office does not relieve you of the responsibility to NOTIFY YOUR INSTRUCTOR of the problem as soon as it arises, and to contact with the instructor again after the documents have been submitted in order to make the appropriate arrangements. If you do not have a justifiable reason for an absence and/or have not followed the procedure described above, you will not be given credit or marks for the work missed during that absence. 4 For more detailed information on these issues, please refer to Senate Policy 134 at (Undergraduate Academic Consideration and Appeals) and Senate Policy 150 (Accommodation of Student Religious Observance Obligations). Both can be found at . Check-list for missed evaluations Complete an Academic Consideration Form: n.pdf Complete a Medical Certificate [ ] or Religious Observances Form [ ], as applicable. Deliver the Academic Consideration Form and the Medical Certificate/Religious Observances Form/Letter for Accommodation to your program office within the appropriate deadline. Deadlines: generally, as soon as possible! In the case of Medical Certificates, within three days of the missed test or examination. In the case of Religious Observances, at least two weeks before the conflict in question, though preferably in the first two weeks of the term. In the case of other circumstances, as soon as possible. Contact your professor ASAP and advise your professor of your situation. Follow-up with your professor after your submit your documentation to make arrangements to complete the missed assignment/test/examination. (It is YOUR responsibility to contact your professor in order to make such arrangements!) Students with Disabilities In order to facilitate the academic success and access of students with disabilities, these students should register with the Access Centre . Before the first graded work is due, students should also inform their instructor through an “Accommodation Form for Professors” that they are registered with the Access Centre and what accommodations are required. Methods of Posting Grades Grades, when available, will be posted on D2L. Students who do not wish their grades posted on D2L must inform the instructor in writing by no later than the second class. Use of Turnitin: Ryerson has subscribed to a service called Turnitin.com which helps professors identify plagiarism and helps students maintain academic integrity. You agree, by taking this course, that all required papers are subject to submission to this service. You may be asked to submit your papers directly to Turnitin.com or your professor may choose to submit your papers. All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of 5 detecting plagiarism of such papers. Use of the Turnitin.com service is subject to the terms of use agreement posted on the Turnitin.com site. If you do not want your work submitted to this plagiarism detection service you must, by the end of the second week of class, consult with your instructor about the alternative requirements. You may be required to submit annotated bibliographies (with comments), periodic drafts, and/or copies of all source articles and websites. When an instructor has reason to suspect that an individual piece of work has been plagiarized, the instructor shall be permitted to submit that work to any plagiarism detection service. Regrading and Recalculation Students who believe that an assignment or an exam has not been appropriately graded must review their concerns with their instructor within 10 working days of the date when the assignment or exam is reviewed in class. Students are strongly advised to attend these reviews. Regrading or recalculation requests are not grounds for appeal, but are matters for discussion between the student and the instructor. Please note that mid-term test and final exam question papers are not handed back to the students. However, students may have supervised access to view the question papers and their answers by making an appointment with the instructor (usually during office hours). While students may make general notes on their performance during such an appointment, they may not copy questions. Important Resources available on Campus Use the services of the University when you are having problems writing, editing or researching papers, or when you need help with course material: o The Library (LIB 2nd floor) provides research workshops and individual assistance. Enquire at the Reference Desk or at: . o The Writing Centre (LIB 272- B) offers one-on-one tutorial help with writing and workshops: . o Learning Success Centre (VIC B-15) offers individual sessions and workshops covering various aspects of researching, writing, and studying: . o English Language Support (VIC B-17) offers workshops to improve overall communication skills . Academic Integrity Ryerson’s Policy 60 (the Student Code of Academic Conduct) applies to all students at the University. The policy and its procedures are triggered in the event that the there is a suspicion that a student has engaged in a form of academic misconduct. Forms of academic misconduct include plagiarism, cheating, supplying false information to the University, and other acts. The most common form of academic misconduct is plagiarism. Plagiarism is a serious academic offence and penalties range from zero in an assignment all the way to expulsion from the university. In any academic exercise, plagiarism occurs when one offers as one’s own work the words, data, ideas, arguments, calculations, designs or 6 productions of another without appropriate attribution or when one allows one’s work to be copied. Students should review the guidelines regarding academic misconduct. It is assumed that all examinations and work submitted for evaluation and course credit will be the product of individual effort, except in the case of team projects arranged for and approved by the course instructor. Submitting the same work to more than one course, without instructor approval, is also considered a form of plagiarism. Submitting the same work to more than one course, without instructors’ approval, is also considered plagiarism. Students must ensure that they understand the conventions for referencing sources in footnotes and bibliographies. In addition to citing quotations from all sources, whether from written materials, interviews, or electronic networks, students must credit with footnotes or in-text references all facts and ideas that are not their own, even if they are in their own words. If you do not, it is considered plagiarism. Students are advised that suspicions of academic misconduct may be referred to the Academic Integrity Office (AIO). Students who are charged with academic misconduct will have a Disciplinary Notation (DN) placed on their academic record (not on their transcript) and will be assigned one or more of the following penalties: A grade reduction for the plagiarized work A zero for the plagiarized work An F in the course More serious penalties up to and including expulsion from the University NOTE: Students may not drop a course when they have been notified of the suspicion of academic misconduct. If a student attempts to drop the course, the Registrar’s office will re-register the student in that course until a decision is reached. For more detailed information on these issues, please refer to the full online text for the Student Code of Academic Conduct at and the Academic Integrity Website at . Students also are strongly encouraged to visit the Ryerson Library website for proper citation and style guides at: . Non-Academic Offences and Professionalism Certain forms of classroom behaviour are not conducive to co-operative learning in the classroom and seriously diminish the educational experience for other students. Such behaviour includes habitual or noisy late arrival, holding private conversations during class, monopolizing class discussion or disrupting the class in any way. If you engage in behaviour which is discourteous to other students in the classroom, you may be required to leave the classroom. Laptop computers should not be used for non-classroom activities as they are distracting to other students, speakers and your instructor. Students who do so will be asked to leave the classroom for the rest of that class and will be prohibited from bringing their laptop to class for the remainder of 7 the semester. Cell phones, recorders and other electronic devices may not be used in class except with the express permission of the instructor. Please note that violation of any of the above rules may be considered an “offence” under Student Code of Non-Academic Conduct (Policy 61) and may result in the imposition of various penalties. Students are required to adhere to all relevant University policies, such as the Student Code of NonAcademic Conduct. University regulations concerning unacceptable academic conduct (cheating, plagiarism, impersonation, etc.) will be followed. See for example: and . Integrity of Tests/Exams Ryerson’s Examination Policy requires that all students have a valid student identification card or other photo identification on their desk at all times when taking an examination. If it is suspected that someone is impersonating a student, the photo identification of that person will be checked, and the person will be asked to sign the exam paper for further verification. If it is suspected that the identification is not valid, students may be asked to provide alternate photo identification. Security may be called, if circumstances warrant. All electronic devices, such as cell phones and mp3 players are prohibited. Students are also not permitted to wear hats or to have food or drink (unless it is in a clear container with no label). For more detailed information on examination policies, please read Examination Policy at: . Standard for Written Work Students are expected to use an acceptable standard of business communication for all assignments. Technical errors (spelling, punctuation, proofing, grammar, format, and citations) and/or inappropriate levels of language or composition may result in marks being deducted. You are encouraged to obtain assistance from the Writing Centre ( ) for help with your written communications as needed. (See the Ryerson Library for APA style guide references: ). Student Responsibilities in Academic Appeals Students should read the Undergraduate Academic Consideration and Appeals policy at: . It is the student’s responsibility to notify and consult with either the instructor, or the Chair/Director of the teaching department/school...
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