HDF Test 2.docx - *Key objectives that she just sent out on Canvas are at the bottom of the doc add notes to answer all the questions she suggests we

HDF Test 2.docx - *Key objectives that she just sent out on...

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, *Key objectives that she just sent out on Canvas are at the bottom of the doc, add notes to answer all the questions she suggests we know about!* Commitment and Relationship Cognition Interdependence Theory Attempt to predict satisfaction and dependence in a relationship Relationship A: very satisfied (somewhat dependent) Relationship B: very dependent (somewhat satisfied) Relationship C: involuntary dependence Relationship D: unstable Interdependence Theory: Satisfaction = outcomes comparison level Comparison level higher than outcomes → not satisfied Outcomes higher than comparison level → satisfied (if comparison level is way lower than outcomes, then satisfaction is even greater) Dependence = outcomes comparison level of alternatives CL of alternatives outcomes → not dependent (unstable relationship, have better alternatives) Outcomes CL of alternatives → dependent (if CL of alternatives is way lower than outcomes, then extremely dependent) Commitment: the subjective experience of dependence Closeness, attachment, loyalty, obligation Intention to remain Long-term orientation The investment model: expansion of the interdependence theory Predicts commitment Satisfaction: Costs vs. rewards = outcomes Satisfaction is measured the exact same in this model! Alternatives:(rather than dependency) Other potential partners (availability of other people) If other partner is not available to you it does not influence commitment (have to be attractive and available in order to influence commitment negatively!) Specific or general No relationship
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Investments: if the relationship were to end what are you not going to get back (to lose) Irretrievable resources Children, house, $$ Joint social networks (who gets what friends) Time, emotions Commitment leads to… stay/leave behavior Perspective taking Accommodation Derogation of alternatives (the more committed you are the less attractive you see others than uncommitted people) Willingness to sacrifice (moving to another place for your partner, partner gives up things to benefit the other partner) illusions/perceives relationship superiority Fidelity Relationship Cognition Cognition- mental process of knowing including: Awareness Perception Reasoning Judgement Cognitive accessibility of commitment- how retrievable/easily accessible ideas about your relationship are to you. More commitment = greater cognition. Attributions How you understand someone’s behavior and explain their motivation Problem solving attempts in DISTRESSED couples have higher rates of negative behavior & more reciprocity in negative behavior More likely to retaliate; negative behavior responded with negative Most satisfied, less distressed couples are less likely to be involved in reciprocity of negative behavior perhaps this is because of attributions made for negative behavior (ex. If
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