Job Satisfaction in Nursing.docx - Job Satisfaction in...

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Job Satisfaction in Nursing1Job Satisfaction in NursingTiffany ParsleyGrand Canyon University: NRS 433VSeptember 8, 2018
Job Satisfaction in NursingPICOT AssignmentPICOT: How does the implementation of positive thoughts into a daily gratitude journal increase nurse satisfaction among nurses?P- To include, but not limited to, in patient cardiac surgery progressive care nurses.I- Daily use of a gratitude journal to increase job satisfactionC- Job satisfaction in cardiac surgery progressive care nurses not using the gratitude journal.O- Job satisfaction scoring will increase with the use of a daily gratitude journal.T- The study will be conducted over a one month span.Article #1: Generating Gratitude in the Workplace to Improve Faculty Job SatisfactionAuthors: Amy Stegen, MSN, RN; and Jamie Wankier, MSN, RNCitation: Stegen, A., & Wankier, J. (2018). Generating Gratitude in the Workplace to Improve Faculty Job Satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Education,57(6), 375-378. doi:10.3928/01484834-20180522-10Abstract: Background: The current nursing shortage affects all settings. In an effort to promote retention of nursing faculty, an “attitude of gratitude” was cultivated to improve job satisfaction and increase collaboration in one school of nursing. Method: This was a quantitative study using a convenience sample of faculty at one school of nursing. A pre survey of faculty on perceived gratitude levels and job satisfaction was administered prior to the start of the school year. Multiple gratitude interventions were implemented throughout the year and a post survey was administered to measure the effectiveness of interventions.
Job Satisfaction in NursingResults: The findings of this study show an improvement of 17.9% in overall job satisfaction, which is consistent with other studies on the topic. Collaboration was not affected by gratitude interventions.Conclusion: Implementing gratitude is a cost-effective and easy way to improve job satisfaction to increase faculty retention rates. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(6):375-378.]Article #2: A qualitative analysis of the Three Good Things intervention in healthcare workersAuthors: Karin Rippstein-Leuenberger, Oliver Mauthner, J Bryan Sexton, Rene SchwendimannCitation: Rippstein-Leuenberger, K., Mauthner, O., Sexton, J. B., & Schwendimann, R. (2017). Aqualitative analysis of the Three Good Things intervention in healthcare workers. BMJ Open,7(5). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-015826Abstract: Background: Intensive care unit (ICU) personnel have an elevated prevalence of job-related burn-out and post-traumatic stress disorder, which can ultimately impact patient care. To strengthen healthcare workers’ skills to deal with stressful events, it is important to focus not only on minimising suffering but also on increasing happiness, as this entails many more benefitsthan simply feeling good. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore the content of the ‘good things’ reported by healthcare workers participating in the ‘Three Good Things’ intervention.

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